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Tsuki Boko Night time Family Photo     http://gionfestival.org/spiritual-origins/

Tsuki Boko Night time Family Photo http://gionfestival.org/spiritual-origins/

Chinese lantern plant festival (Hoozuki-Ichi) at Sensoji temple (July 9 and 10) Many kinds of food stall! Yummy!

Chinese lantern plant festival (Hoozuki-Ichi) at Sensoji temple (July 9 and 10) Many kinds of food stall! Yummy!

Takeshita Street ( 竹下通り ), Harajuku ( 原宿 ), Shibuya ( 渋谷 ), Tokyo ( 東京 ), Japan ( 日本 ) live in japan

Takeshita Street ( 竹下通り ), Harajuku ( 原宿 ), Shibuya ( 渋谷 ), Tokyo ( 東京 ), Japan ( 日本 ) live in japan

"Historically, the Gion festival is an interesting coming together of essentially autonomous neighborhood associations, called chōnai. The chōnai are essential to everything about the festival; traditionally each chōnai funded its own hoko, and the rise and fall of the festival yamaboko mirrored the fluctuations in fortunes of chōnai members" - http://gionfestival.org/community/

"Historically, the Gion festival is an interesting coming together of essentially autonomous neighborhood associations, called chōnai. The chōnai are essential to everything about the festival; traditionally each chōnai funded its own hoko, and the rise and fall of the festival yamaboko mirrored the fluctuations in fortunes of chōnai members" - http://gionfestival.org/community/

The true luminaries of the Gion Festival are the panoply of deities that the festival is dedicated to: Yasaka Shrine’s three deities, the “Ox-Headed Emperor” (Gozu Tennō), and the additional deities respectively enshrined by each float neighborhood. However, deities are generally invisible, and most of our worldly attention is captured by the eye-catching festival … http://gionfestival.org

The true luminaries of the Gion Festival are the panoply of deities that the festival is dedicated to: Yasaka Shrine’s three deities, the “Ox-Headed Emperor” (Gozu Tennō), and the additional deities respectively enshrined by each float neighborhood. However, deities are generally invisible, and most of our worldly attention is captured by the eye-catching festival … http://gionfestival.org

The Koi (“Carp”) float, for example, is topped by a Shinto shrine adorned with a wooden carving of a giant carp, swimming up waves representing a waterfall. No one’s worshipping the big fish; it refers to an ancient Japanese legend about a carp that persevered against the downward deluge, finally and miraculously succeeding in reaching the top of a waterfall. Thereupon it transformed into a celestial dragon, and flew off effortlessly into the sky. - http://gionfestival.org/

The Koi (“Carp”) float, for example, is topped by a Shinto shrine adorned with a wooden carving of a giant carp, swimming up waves representing a waterfall. No one’s worshipping the big fish; it refers to an ancient Japanese legend about a carp that persevered against the downward deluge, finally and miraculously succeeding in reaching the top of a waterfall. Thereupon it transformed into a celestial dragon, and flew off effortlessly into the sky. - http://gionfestival.org/

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