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Media by Bryon Gloden CISSP published June 15 2017 at 12:53AM

June 15, 2017 at 12:48AM

Amazingly Beautiful Blue Nebula, a massive interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other ionized gases.

.a strange 196-mile (315km) scar that sits almost right in the middle of the Martian equator on the northern edge of the Valles Marineris canyon... flood topography like in Colorado Plateau - 4 Corners area

.a strange 196-mile (315km) scar that sits almost right in the middle of the Martian equator on the northern edge of the Valles Marineris canyon... flood topography like in Colorado Plateau - 4 Corners area

The Port Hudson, La., battlefield of 1863, scene of a siege and several assaults, taken by Baton Rouge photographers McPherson and Oliver. Such photos are quite scarce, says Bob Zeller of the Center for Civil War Photography. Robin Crawford owned more than 35 views, a remarkable number.

The Port Hudson, La., battlefield of 1863, scene of a siege and several assaults, taken by Baton Rouge photographers McPherson and Oliver. Such photos are quite scarce, says Bob Zeller of the Center for Civil War Photography. Robin Crawford owned more than 35 views, a remarkable number.

Mars April 25, 1998 Mars Global Surveyor views Olympus Mons -- taller than three Mount Everests and about as wide as the entire Hawaiian island chain. This giant volcano is nearly as flat as a pancake. That is, its flanks typically only slope 2 to 5 degrees. The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) obtained this spectacular wide-angle view of Olympus Mons on Mars Global Surveyor's 263rd orbit, around 10:40 p.m. PDT on 25 April 1998. In the view presented here, north is to the left and east is up.

Mars April 25, 1998 Mars Global Surveyor views Olympus Mons -- taller than three Mount Everests and about as wide as the entire Hawaiian island chain. This giant volcano is nearly as flat as a pancake. That is, its flanks typically only slope 2 to 5 degrees. The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) obtained this spectacular wide-angle view of Olympus Mons on Mars Global Surveyor's 263rd orbit, around 10:40 p.m. PDT on 25 April 1998. In the view presented here, north is to the left and east is up.

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