Explore Roman Empire, Army and more!

A Centurion directs Roman Legionaries in a First Century AD battle.

A Centurion directs Roman Legionaries in a First Century AD battle.

Legio XII Fulminata Centurion - Paterna, Victrix, Antiqua, Certa Constans, Galliena - http://www.inblogg.com/legio-xii-fulminata-centurion-paterna-victrix-antiqua-certa-constans-galliena/

Legio XII Fulminata Centurion - Paterna, Victrix, Antiqua, Certa Constans, Galliena - http://www.inblogg.com/legio-xii-fulminata-centurion-paterna-victrix-antiqua-certa-constans-galliena/

Roman testudo (tortoise) formation.  In Ancient Roman warfare, the testudo or tortoise formation was a formation used commonly by the Roman Legions during battles, particularly sieges. Testudo is the Latin word for "tortoise". The Greek term for this formation is "chelone" and during the Byzantine era, it seems to have evolved to what military manuals of the era call the "foulkon".

'Rome, Sweet Rome': Could a Single Marine Unit Destroy the Roman Empire?

Roman testudo (tortoise) formation. In Ancient Roman warfare, the testudo or tortoise formation was a formation used commonly by the Roman Legions during battles, particularly sieges. Testudo is the Latin word for "tortoise". The Greek term for this formation is "chelone" and during the Byzantine era, it seems to have evolved to what military manuals of the era call the "foulkon".

The Carthaginian Wars 265-146 BC • Triarius • Hastatus or Princeps • Veles

The Carthaginian Wars 265-146 BC • Triarius • Hastatus or Princeps • Veles

The Roman army standards - The signa militaria, or military standards served as landmarks between different Roman units, serving as a rally point in the chaos of battle. The various units that made up the Roman army needed some kind of recognizable symbol to be followed in the confusion of combat. So it was very important that the naked eye could see and know, what it was for.

The Roman army standards - The signa militaria, or military standards served as landmarks between different Roman units, serving as a rally point in the chaos of battle. The various units that made up the Roman army needed some kind of recognizable symbol to be followed in the confusion of combat. So it was very important that the naked eye could see and know, what it was for.

Pinterest
Search