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Jouska

Word: Jouska (n.) a hypothetical conversation that you compulsively play out in your head.

Very unusual words and their meaning.

I love words and language. (Wow, not only did my absolute favorite word show up on this list, but it has an equally lovely sounding word meaning the opposite that I was unaware of.

Why can't english have words like these?

Untranslatable words from other languages.

Komorebi-- I often seek a word to describe that. - 11 Untranslatable Words From Other Cultures Infographic. things English don't have a words for that other languages do

Funny pictures about Who Else Finds The Sound Of Rain Charming? Oh, and cool pics about Who Else Finds The Sound Of Rain Charming? Also, Who Else Finds The Sound Of Rain Charming?

My friend is an Askhole, so we got a Dudevorce. Now he just goes out Masturdating

My friend is an Askhole, so we got a Dudevorce. Now he just goes out Masturdating ⬆️ Good job random person

pronunciation |  \a-‘cat-a-lep-sE\                  #acatalepsy, noun, English, philosophy, certainty, sorry for the lack of tags, in a bit of a hurry, words, otherwordly, other-wordly, definitions, A,

A words definitions english philosophy noun otherwordly other-wordly acatalepsy certainty sorry for the lack of tags in a bit of a hurry

by Ira Glass - so so true!!

The truth // Ira Glass. Calling all writers, artists and creative people. Great inspirational quote to keep going.

alexithymia (n.) difficulty describing feelings to other people. Otherwise known as me....

alexithymia (n.) difficulty describing feelings to other people. <--This is why when I'm trying to express my feelings I end up saying "I don't know" a lot.

‘Perfect’ Words From The Japanese Language That We Need In Our Vocabulary - DesignTAXI.com

*MAJIME: a reliable person, who gts job done, Perfect Japanese Words You Need In Your Life

15 Words You Cannot Translate Into English

15 Words You Cannot Translate Into English

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The color amaranthine came from the Greek word ‘amarantos’ which meant unfading. The word Amaranth was used to name an imaginary, undying flower that was, presumably, a deep red-purple color and there you have the two uses of the word today.