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Chief Seattle (an Anglicization of Si'ahl), (Lushootseed pronunciation: [ˈsiʔaːɬ], originally [ˈsiʔaːƛ̓];[1] c. 1780 – June 7, 1866) was a Dkhw’Duw’Absh (Duwamish) chief...The city of Seattle, in the U.S. state of Washington, was named after him. A widely publicized speech arguing in favor of ecological responsibility and respect of native Americans' land rights has been attributed to him.

Duwamish and Suquamish Chief Seattle portrait, Seattle, Washington, by Edward S. Curtis (his first Native American Photograph).

the original founding fathers: Chief Joseph, Red Cloud, Sitting Bull and Geronimo (I'd add Chief Seattle too)

The white man LIED once againAnd the sad part about this you allow your children, child to accept these white lies in schools,universities.

Three Eagles, a Nez Perce Warrior. Taken by Edward S. Curtis in 1910. ( Colorized by German artist The original Curtis photo is sepia.)

Photography: People – Three Eagles, a Nez Perce Warrior. Taken by Edward S. Curtis in ( Some Pinner colorized this photo. The original is similar to the rest -- Sepia)

This post contains beautiful Native American Indian Wisdom that can inspire all of us. A collection of various quotes from various tribes and quotes designed by different artists.

So wise! "Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All thing are bound together. All things connect. what a beautiful thought!

"The wind that gave me my first breath also received my last sigh..."

Beautiful epitaph: "The wind that gave me my first breath also received my last sigh.

Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle at home in  1890, photo courtesy University of Washington Library

Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle at home (near the foot of Pike street) in photo courtesy University of Washington Library

Popularly named "Princess Angeline" Chief Seattle's daughter rests on the boardwalk descending on the south side of Pike Street west of First Avenue in the early 1890s and years before there was any Pike Place.

Popularly named "Princess Angeline" Chief Seattle's daughter rests on the boardwalk descending on the south side of Pike Street west of First Avenue in the early and years before there was any Pike Place.

“If all the beasts were gone, men would die from a great loneliness of spirit, for whatever happens to the beasts also happens to man. All things are connected. Whatever befalls the Earth, befalls the sons of the Earth.” ~Chief Seattle

we can't set off an ecological cascade of negative effects without impacting humans

"Kick-is-on-lo Cud was the eldest daughter of Chief Seattle. During her long life, she saw the coming of white settlers, the exile of her Duwamish and Suquamish people from their traditional lands, and the growth of the new city named for her father. She didn't move to the Port Madison Reservation with the rest of her people, but stayed in Seattle. She earned her living doing laundry for some of Seattle's prominent families. A white friend asked to call her 'Angeline' and others later added…

Photos: Early photos of Native Americans in Seattle

"Kick-is-on-lo Cud was the eldest daughter of Chief Seattle. During her long life, she saw the coming of white settlers, the exile of her Duwamish and Suquamish people from their traditional lands, and the growth of the new city named for her father. She didn't move to the Port Madison Reservation with the rest of her people, but stayed in Seattle. She earned her living doing laundry for some of Seattle's prominent families. A white friend asked to call her 'Angeline' and others later added…

Chief Seattle

All things share the same breath - the beast, the tree, the man, the air shares its spirit with all the life it supports. Chief Seattle, really Chief Sealth

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