Venus passes across the face of the sun on June 5,2012 - Crew members aboard the  International Space Station set up  cameras in several locations to record the rare event

Venus passes across the face of the sun on June 5,2012 - Crew members aboard the International Space Station set up cameras in several locations to record the rare event

Like a proud peacock displaying its tail, Enceladus shows off its beautiful plume to the Cassini spacecrafts cameras.   Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) is seen here illuminated by light reflected off Saturn.   This view looks toward the Saturn-facing side of Enceladus. North on Enceladus is up and rotated 45 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 18, 2013.

Like a proud peacock displaying its tail, Enceladus shows off its beautiful plume to the Cassini spacecrafts cameras. Enceladus (313 miles, or 504 kilometers across) is seen here illuminated by light reflected off Saturn. This view looks toward the Saturn-facing side of Enceladus. North on Enceladus is up and rotated 45 degrees to the right. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 18, 2013.

Using observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have obtained the first X-ray evidence of a supernova shock wave breaking through a cocoon of gas surrounding the star that exploded. This discovery may help astronomers understand why some supernovas are much more powerful than others

Using observations from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, researchers have obtained the first X-ray evidence of a supernova shock wave breaking through a cocoon of gas surrounding the star that exploded. This discovery may help astronomers understand why some supernovas are much more powerful than others

Black Hole Caught in a Stellar Homicide  This computer-simulated image shows gas from a star that is ripped apart by tidal forces as it falls into a black hole. Some of the gas also is being ejected at high speeds into space.

Black Hole Caught in a Stellar Homicide This computer-simulated image shows gas from a star that is ripped apart by tidal forces as it falls into a black hole. Some of the gas also is being ejected at high speeds into space.

NASA sez: Enceladus, Saturn's Moon. Below a darkened Enceladus, a plume of water ice is backlit in this view of one of Saturn's most dramatic moons.  Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice from many locations along the moon's famed "tiger stripes" near the south pole of Enceladus. The tiger stripes are fissures that spray icy particles, water vapor and organic compounds.

NASA sez: Enceladus, Saturn's Moon. Below a darkened Enceladus, a plume of water ice is backlit in this view of one of Saturn's most dramatic moons. Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice from many locations along the moon's famed "tiger stripes" near the south pole of Enceladus. The tiger stripes are fissures that spray icy particles, water vapor and organic compounds.

A brightly reflective Enceladus appears before Saturn's rings, while the planet's larger moon Titan looms in the distance.    Jets of water ice and vapor emanating from the south pole of Enceladus, which hint at subsurface sea rich in organics, and liquid hydrocarbons ponding on the surface on the surface of Titan make these two of the most fascinating moons in the Saturnian system.

A brightly reflective Enceladus appears before Saturn's rings, while the planet's larger moon Titan looms in the distance. Jets of water ice and vapor emanating from the south pole of Enceladus, which hint at subsurface sea rich in organics, and liquid hydrocarbons ponding on the surface on the surface of Titan make these two of the most fascinating moons in the Saturnian system.

Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search