Explore Giant Anteater, Brazil and more!

Giant anteater by manoela bernardy

Giant anteater by manoela bernardy

White-Lipped Peccary - The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) shares many similarities with the collared peccary, although the former species is known to be more aggressive. It also is more social, living in herds of 50 to several hundred animals. When startled, such as by a safari vehicle at night, the peccary makes a harsh clicking sound and releases a musky skunk-like odor.

White-Lipped Peccary - The white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) shares many similarities with the collared peccary, although the former species is known to be more aggressive. It also is more social, living in herds of 50 to several hundred animals. When startled, such as by a safari vehicle at night, the peccary makes a harsh clicking sound and releases a musky skunk-like odor.

A baby elephant drinking...when they are this young, they don’t know how to use their trunks to drink.

A baby elephant drinking...when they are this young, they don’t know how to use their trunks to drink.

Puma by on of my guests, Brian Davis.

Puma by on of my guests, Brian Davis.

by Molly Leight

by Molly Leight

by manoela bernardy

by manoela bernardy

The Pantanal  This vast wetland area, which spreads across parts of Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia, may be less famous than the Amazon, but the wildlife watching here is superb. You will find more than 650 bird species and 80 mammal species, including the capybara (the world’s largest rodent, pictured), giant otters and monkeys. In fact, owing to the dense concentration of species, your chances of seeing animals here are generally better than in most parts of the Amazon

Unmissable South America

The Pantanal This vast wetland area, which spreads across parts of Brazil, Paraguay and Bolivia, may be less famous than the Amazon, but the wildlife watching here is superb. You will find more than 650 bird species and 80 mammal species, including the capybara (the world’s largest rodent, pictured), giant otters and monkeys. In fact, owing to the dense concentration of species, your chances of seeing animals here are generally better than in most parts of the Amazon

Giant Armadillos have poor eyesight and see the world largely through scent. Here, one checks the air around the den before heading off for the night.

Giant Armadillos have poor eyesight and see the world largely through scent. Here, one checks the air around the den before heading off for the night.

Caimans by manoela bernardy

Caimans by manoela bernardy

Anhinga drying it's wings out.

Anhinga drying it's wings out.

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