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Neuroscientist Prof Gina Rippon, of Aston University, Birmingham, says gender differences emerge only through environmental factors and are not innate.

Men and women do not have different brains, claims neuroscientist

Neuroscientist Prof Gina Rippon claims male and female brains only differ because of the relentless drip, drip, drip of gender stereotyping

Men and women do not have different brains, claims neuroscientist

Men and women do not have different brains, claims neuroscientist - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/10684179/Men-and-women-do-not-have-different-brains-claims-neuroscientist.html

International Women's Day 2014: What's the difference between men and

The notion that men and women have different brain structures is merely a myth pedalled by the “drip, drip, drip” of gender stereotyping, a neuroscientist has claimed on International Women’s Day.

Men are NOT from Mars: Scientist claims male & female brains the same

Men are NOT from Mars after all: Scientist claims male and female brains are the same and it's gender stereotyping which makes us different http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2576241/Men-NOT-Mars-Scientist-claims-male-female-brains-gender-stereotyping-makes-different.html

In pictures: Models wear glow-in-the-dark make-up for photographer Hid Saib

In pictures: Models wear glow-in-the-dark make-up for photographer Hid Saib - Telegraph

Emily Bazelon Reviews Lise Eliot's 'Pink Brain, Blue Brain'

From the Washington Post: "Her approach is especially welcome because the exaggeration of brain-based sex differences has launched a publishing flurry in the past few years from credentialed authors who should know better. Eliot calls them out by name -- the prime culprits are Louann Brizendine, Leonard Sax and Michael Gurian -- and hacks away at their groundless claims."

Scientists discover brain's 'misery molecule' which affects stress, anxiety and depression

Scientists discover brain's 'misery molecule' which affects stress, anxiety and depression -- It has long been known that the gland controls stress, depression and anxiety by releasing stress chemicals, the Sunday Times reports. Now, scientists have discovered the response is triggered by CRF1 - which is found in the outer membranes of pituitary cells.