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A Major Mystery About Earth's Magnetic Field Has Just Been Solved

for all my fellow space/science geeks out there... http://gizmodo.com/a-major-mystery-about-earths-magnetic-field-has-just-be-1776291902

Earth's magnetic field, also known as the geomagnetic field, is the magnetic field that extends from the Earth's interior out into space, where it meets the solar wind, a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun. Its magnitude at the Earth's surface ranges from 25 to 65 microteslas .[3] Roughly speaking it is the field of a magnetic dipole currently tilted at an angle of about 10 degrees with respect to Earth's rotational axis, as if there were a bar magnet placed at that angle at…

PAUL A. LaVIOLETTE, PH.D~ Proposes cosmic ray storms encountered when crossing through galactic super waves will increase CME activity by up to 1,000X. Such severe solar storms could impact Earth’s magnetosphere & become trapped there to form storm-time radiation belts & generate an equatorial ring current which could cancel out the Earth’s magnetic field & flip poles to an equatorial location to adopt a reversed polarity. This geomagnetic excursion would be rapid, occurring in a matter of…

Solar Dynamics Observatory Welcomes the New Year

Solar Dynamics Observatory Welcomes the New Year -- There were no fireworks on the sun to welcome in the New Year and only a few C-class flares during the last day of 2014. Instead, the sun starts 2015 with an enormous coronal hole near the south pole. This image, captured on Jan. 1, 2015 by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, shows the coronal hole as a dark region in the south. Coronal holes are regions of the corona where the magnetic…

An extensive coronal hole rotated towards Earth over several days last week (May 28-31, 2013). The massive coronal area is one of the largest we have seen in a year or more. Coronal holes are the source of strong solar wind gusts that carry solar particles out to our magnetosphere and beyond. They appear darker in extreme ultraviolet light images (here, a combination of three wavelengths of UV light) because there is just less matter at the temperatures we are observing in.