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This week, the Ontario Premier officially apologized to the Franco-Ontarian community for Regulation 17, which outlawed French in education for Ontario kids from 1912 and 1927 (not abolished until 1944). This was taken in 1922, at Yonge & Adelaide in Toronto. Vive les #franco-ontariens!

This week, the Ontario Premier officially apologized to the Franco-Ontarian community for Regulation 17, which outlawed French in education for Ontario kids from 1912 and 1927 (not abolished until 1944). This was taken in 1922, at Yonge & Adelaide in Toronto. Vive les #franco-ontariens!

Murphy family and friends at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island, [ca. 1901]   Photographer unknown  Rowley Murphy collection  Reference Code: C 59-1-0-7-1  Archives of Ontario, I0013699

Murphy family and friends at Hanlan's Point, Toronto Island, [ca. 1901] Photographer unknown Rowley Murphy collection Reference Code: C 59-1-0-7-1 Archives of Ontario, I0013699

Couldn’t resist this picture of the East End Day Nursery from around 1900! Founded in 1892, in a building shared with the Sackville Street Mission, it was one of only two daycare centres in the city. Its goal was to prevent social problems: “We come to the aid of people who, perhaps, might become paupers and possibly their children criminals”.   More info: Howe & Prochner. Early Childhood Care and Education in Canada. UBC Press, 2000.

Couldn’t resist this picture of the East End Day Nursery from around 1900! Founded in 1892, in a building shared with the Sackville Street Mission, it was one of only two daycare centres in the city. Its goal was to prevent social problems: “We come to the aid of people who, perhaps, might become paupers and possibly their children criminals”. More info: Howe & Prochner. Early Childhood Care and Education in Canada. UBC Press, 2000.

Red Lion Hotel, Yonge St., e. side, n. of Bloor St., Toronto, Ontario

Red Lion Hotel, Yonge St., e. side, n. of Bloor St., Toronto, Ontario

Vintage photographs of what winter used to look like in Toronto make up only a small portion of the images collected in the many historical posts p...

Vintage photographs of what winter used to look like in Toronto make up only a small portion of the images collected in the many historical posts p...

In the summer of 1893, it was hot and it was dry. There was a drought, and that September the City’s water intake pipe broke. This meant that water had to be brought in by wagon—people would go out into the street to meet the wagon and fill their buckets, cans and other containers. This picture was taken on York Street, looking north from Adelaide Street West.

In the summer of 1893, it was hot and it was dry. There was a drought, and that September the City’s water intake pipe broke. This meant that water had to be brought in by wagon—people would go out into the street to meet the wagon and fill their buckets, cans and other containers. This picture was taken on York Street, looking north from Adelaide Street West.

Dawes Road at Danforth Avenue, one hundred years ago: wooden sidewalks, dirt roads, horse drawn wagon (maybe headed from the feed store there, or more likely from the Grand Trunk railway). In the 19th & early 20th centuries, Dawes Road was one of Ontario's busiest roads, bringing livestock, produce and lumber to market in the city. It was just north and east of the village of Norway, now the Main & Danforth area.

Dawes Road at Danforth Avenue, one hundred years ago: wooden sidewalks, dirt roads, horse drawn wagon (maybe headed from the feed store there, or more likely from the Grand Trunk railway). In the 19th & early 20th centuries, Dawes Road was one of Ontario's busiest roads, bringing livestock, produce and lumber to market in the city. It was just north and east of the village of Norway, now the Main & Danforth area.

It’s Budget Time in the city, and we hear lots of talk about infrastructure and the need to improve it. This picture shows the Mayor, T.L. Church, turning the sod on an infrastructure project that had everyone talking back in 1915: the construction of the Bloor St. Viaduct. This picture was taken on January 16, 1915, in the Don Valley.

It’s Budget Time in the city, and we hear lots of talk about infrastructure and the need to improve it. This picture shows the Mayor, T.L. Church, turning the sod on an infrastructure project that had everyone talking back in 1915: the construction of the Bloor St. Viaduct. This picture was taken on January 16, 1915, in the Don Valley.

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