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Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Million Dollar Baby"  Use the ar­rows be­low — or on your key­board — to learn more about each year:  http://timelines.latimes.com/academy-awards/

Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman in a scene from "Million Dollar Baby" Use the ar­rows be­low — or on your key­board — to learn more about each year: http://timelines.latimes.com/academy-awards/

Oscars: March 23, 1950: Best picture: ‘All the King’s Men’  “The Heir­ess” is the night’s biggest win­ner, tak­ing 4 of 8 nominations.  Act­or: Bro­d­er­ick Craw­ford, “All the King’s Men”  Act­ress: Olivia de Havil­land, “The Heir­ess”  Sup­port­ing act­or: Dean Jag­ger, “12 O’Clock High”  Sup­port­ing act­ress: Mer­cedes Mc­Cam­bridge, “All the King’s Men”  Dir­ect­or: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, for “A Let­ter to Three Wives”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars: March 23, 1950: Best picture: ‘All the King’s Men’ “The Heir­ess” is the night’s biggest win­ner, tak­ing 4 of 8 nominations. Act­or: Bro­d­er­ick Craw­ford, “All the King’s Men” Act­ress: Olivia de Havil­land, “The Heir­ess” Sup­port­ing act­or: Dean Jag­ger, “12 O’Clock High” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Mer­cedes Mc­Cam­bridge, “All the King’s Men” Dir­ect­or: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, for “A Let­ter to Three Wives”

March 4, 1937, Oscars:  The  academy re­cog­nizes sup­port­ing per­form­ances  Act­or: Paul Muni, “The Story of Louis Pas­teur”  Act­ress: Lu­ise Rain­er, “The Great Ziegfeld” Sup­port­ing act­or: Wal­ter Bren­nan, “Come and Get It” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Gale Son­der­gaard, “An­thony Ad­verse”  Dir­ect­or: Frank Capra, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”  Best Picture:  The Great Ziegfeld.

The Academy Awards through the years

March 4, 1937, Oscars: The academy re­cog­nizes sup­port­ing per­form­ances Act­or: Paul Muni, “The Story of Louis Pas­teur” Act­ress: Lu­ise Rain­er, “The Great Ziegfeld” Sup­port­ing act­or: Wal­ter Bren­nan, “Come and Get It” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Gale Son­der­gaard, “An­thony Ad­verse” Dir­ect­or: Frank Capra, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” Best Picture: The Great Ziegfeld.

Oscars, March 29, 1976:  March 29, 1976.  Best picture: ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’  Oc­to­gen­ari­an Mary Pick­ford ac­cepts a spe­cial Oscar. Act­or: Jack Nich­olson, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” Act­ress: Louise Fletch­er, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”  Sup­port­ing act­or: George Burns, “The Sun­shine Boys” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Lee  Grant, “Sham­poo”  Dir­ect­or: Mi­los Forman, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars, March 29, 1976: March 29, 1976. Best picture: ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ Oc­to­gen­ari­an Mary Pick­ford ac­cepts a spe­cial Oscar. Act­or: Jack Nich­olson, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” Act­ress: Louise Fletch­er, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” Sup­port­ing act­or: George Burns, “The Sun­shine Boys” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Lee Grant, “Sham­poo” Dir­ect­or: Mi­los Forman, “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

Oscars:  April 6, 1959  Best picture: ‘Gigi’, The broad­cast ends 20 minutes early, leav­ing host Jerry Lewis at­tempt­ing to fill time. This marks the last time any­one says the Oscars ce­re­mony is too short.  Act­or: Dav­id Niven, “Sep­ar­ate Tables”  Act­ress: Susan Hay­ward, “I Want to Live!”  Sup­port­ing act­or: Burl Ives, “The Big Coun­try” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Wendy Hiller, “Sep­ar­ate Tables”  Dir­ect­or: Vin­cente Min­nel­li, “Gigi”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars: April 6, 1959 Best picture: ‘Gigi’, The broad­cast ends 20 minutes early, leav­ing host Jerry Lewis at­tempt­ing to fill time. This marks the last time any­one says the Oscars ce­re­mony is too short. Act­or: Dav­id Niven, “Sep­ar­ate Tables” Act­ress: Susan Hay­ward, “I Want to Live!” Sup­port­ing act­or: Burl Ives, “The Big Coun­try” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Wendy Hiller, “Sep­ar­ate Tables” Dir­ect­or: Vin­cente Min­nel­li, “Gigi”

Oscars, April 3, 1978:  April 3, 1978   Best picture: ‘Annie Hall’  Box-of­fice block­buster “Star Wars” takes six reg­u­lar and one spe­cial Oscar. Woody Al­len is a no-show and Vanessa Redgrave’s fiery, polit­ic­al ac­cept­ance speech draws boos and hisses. Act­or: Richard Drey­fuss, “The Good­bye Girl”  Act­ress: Di­ane Keaton, “An­nie Hall”  Sup­port­ing act­or: Jason Robards, “Ju­lia”  Sup­port­ing act­ress: Vanessa Redgrave, “Ju­lia” Dir­ect­or: Woody Al­len, “An­nie Hall”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars, April 3, 1978: April 3, 1978 Best picture: ‘Annie Hall’ Box-of­fice block­buster “Star Wars” takes six reg­u­lar and one spe­cial Oscar. Woody Al­len is a no-show and Vanessa Redgrave’s fiery, polit­ic­al ac­cept­ance speech draws boos and hisses. Act­or: Richard Drey­fuss, “The Good­bye Girl” Act­ress: Di­ane Keaton, “An­nie Hall” Sup­port­ing act­or: Jason Robards, “Ju­lia” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Vanessa Redgrave, “Ju­lia” Dir­ect­or: Woody Al­len, “An­nie Hall”

Oscars: March 27, 1957:  Best picture: ‘Around the World in 80 Days’, Jerry Lewis hosts in LA , with Celeste Holm in NYC. The first for­eign-lan­guage film award goes to Fe­d­erico Fellini’s “La Strada.”  Act­or: Yul Bryn­ner, “The King and I”  Act­ress: In­grid Berg­man, “Ana­stas­ia” Sup­port­ing act­or: An­thony  Quinn, “Lust for Life” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Dorothy Malone, “Writ­ten on the Wind”  Dir­ect­or: George Stevens, “Gi­ant”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars: March 27, 1957: Best picture: ‘Around the World in 80 Days’, Jerry Lewis hosts in LA , with Celeste Holm in NYC. The first for­eign-lan­guage film award goes to Fe­d­erico Fellini’s “La Strada.” Act­or: Yul Bryn­ner, “The King and I” Act­ress: In­grid Berg­man, “Ana­stas­ia” Sup­port­ing act­or: An­thony Quinn, “Lust for Life” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Dorothy Malone, “Writ­ten on the Wind” Dir­ect­or: George Stevens, “Gi­ant”

Oscars, 1948:  Best picture: ‘Gentleman’s Agreement’  Lor­etta Young’s un­ex­pec­ted win for lead act­ress is a “ma­jor up­set,” ac­cord­ing to The Times’ cov­er­age.  Act­or: Ron­ald Col­man, “A Double Life”  Act­ress: Lor­etta Young, “The Farm­er’s Daugh­ter”  Sup­port­ing act­or: Ed­mund Gwenn, “Mir­acle on 34th Street”  Sup­port­ing act­ress: Celeste Holm, “Gen­tle­man’s Agree­ment” Dir­ect­or: Elia Kazan, “Gen­tle­man’s Agree­ment”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars, 1948: Best picture: ‘Gentleman’s Agreement’ Lor­etta Young’s un­ex­pec­ted win for lead act­ress is a “ma­jor up­set,” ac­cord­ing to The Times’ cov­er­age. Act­or: Ron­ald Col­man, “A Double Life” Act­ress: Lor­etta Young, “The Farm­er’s Daugh­ter” Sup­port­ing act­or: Ed­mund Gwenn, “Mir­acle on 34th Street” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Celeste Holm, “Gen­tle­man’s Agree­ment” Dir­ect­or: Elia Kazan, “Gen­tle­man’s Agree­ment”

Oscars: March 25, 1954:  March 25, 1954   Best picture: ‘From Here to Eternity’, Tele­vised, with Don­ald O’Con­nor in LA and Fre­dric March in NYC.  Act­or: Wil­li­am Hold­en, “Stalag 17”  Act­ress: Audrey Hep­burn, “Ro­man Hol­i­day” Sup­port­ing act­or: Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Etern­ity”  Sup­port­ing act­ress: Donna Reed, “From Here to Etern­ity”

The Academy Awards through the years

Oscars: March 25, 1954: March 25, 1954 Best picture: ‘From Here to Eternity’, Tele­vised, with Don­ald O’Con­nor in LA and Fre­dric March in NYC. Act­or: Wil­li­am Hold­en, “Stalag 17” Act­ress: Audrey Hep­burn, “Ro­man Hol­i­day” Sup­port­ing act­or: Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Etern­ity” Sup­port­ing act­ress: Donna Reed, “From Here to Etern­ity”

Luther Vandross (April 20, 1951 – July 1, 2005) was an American singer-songwriter and record producer. During his career, Vandross sold over twenty-five million albums and won eight Grammy Awards including Best Male R Vocal Performance four times. He won four Grammy Awards in 2004 including the Grammy Award for Song of the Year for the track "Dance with My Father".

Luther Vandross (April 20, 1951 – July 1, 2005) was an American singer-songwriter and record producer. During his career, Vandross sold over twenty-five million albums and won eight Grammy Awards including Best Male R Vocal Performance four times. He won four Grammy Awards in 2004 including the Grammy Award for Song of the Year for the track "Dance with My Father".

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