Explore Kamakura, Japan and more!

Explore related topics

Portrait de Fuku Sanzo  Epoque de Kamakura XIII-XIV couleurs, encre, poudre d'or (kindei) sur soie

Portrait de Fuku Sanzo Epoque de Kamakura XIII-XIV couleurs, encre, poudre d'or (kindei) sur soie

Prince Shotoku Taishi, c. 1400; Muromachi period, 1333–1568 | Princeton University Art Museum

Prince Shotoku Taishi, c. 1400; Muromachi period, 1333–1568 | Princeton University Art Museum

Chimzo de Maître Muso Soseki, 1340 | Assis jambes cachées dans robe monastique en surplis des grands moines (2 épaules couvertes et surplis attaché anneau jade/nacre), mains geste méditation; chaise + canne + piédestal marques Enseignement Zen; Chimzo portraits maîtres bouddhiques peints/sculptés de leur vivant ou peu après leur mort pour diffusion Enseignement école rattachée.

Chimzo de Maître Muso Soseki, 1340 | Assis jambes cachées dans robe monastique en surplis des grands moines (2 épaules couvertes et surplis attaché anneau jade/nacre), mains geste méditation; chaise + canne + piédestal marques Enseignement Zen; Chimzo portraits maîtres bouddhiques peints/sculptés de leur vivant ou peu après leur mort pour diffusion Enseignement école rattachée.

En no Gyoja | Kimbell Art Museum.Japan.Kamakura period (1185–1333).c. 1300–1375.En no Gyoja was the legendary founder of the Shugendo sect, which emphasized the practice of religious austerities, and he thus came to represent the archetypical ascetic recluse. He is said to have died in the early eighth century after living a hermetic life in the mountains. Because he shunned the established religious orders in the capital at Nara in favor of a solitary, itinerant life in the southern…

En no Gyoja | Kimbell Art Museum.Japan.Kamakura period (1185–1333).c. 1300–1375.En no Gyoja was the legendary founder of the Shugendo sect, which emphasized the practice of religious austerities, and he thus came to represent the archetypical ascetic recluse. He is said to have died in the early eighth century after living a hermetic life in the mountains. Because he shunned the established religious orders in the capital at Nara in favor of a solitary, itinerant life in the southern…

Jianzhen (or Ganjin) (鑒真 or 鑑真; 688–763) was a Chinese monk who helped to propagate Buddhism in Japan. In the eleven years from 743 to 754, Jianzhen attempted to visit Japan some six times.

Jianzhen (or Ganjin) (鑒真 or 鑑真; 688–763) was a Chinese monk who helped to propagate Buddhism in Japan. In the eleven years from 743 to 754, Jianzhen attempted to visit Japan some six times.

Japanese Important Cultural Property,  A standing statue of 11-faced Kannon Bosatsu                        十一面観音菩薩立像(海龍王寺)

Japanese Important Cultural Property, A standing statue of 11-faced Kannon Bosatsu 十一面観音菩薩立像(海龍王寺)

Wooden statue of Mujaku Bosatsu  (national treasure): the brothers Mujaku and Seshin were the founders of Yuishiki Kyogaku (studying the theory that all existence is subjective and nothing exists outside of the mind) who were active in India around the fifth century, are respected by the Hosso sect to which Kofuku-ji Temple belongs.

Wooden statue of Mujaku Bosatsu (national treasure): the brothers Mujaku and Seshin were the founders of Yuishiki Kyogaku (studying the theory that all existence is subjective and nothing exists outside of the mind) who were active in India around the fifth century, are respected by the Hosso sect to which Kofuku-ji Temple belongs.

Pinterest
Search