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Oribe-style incense container with design of kudzu  18th century    Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743)   Edo period     Buff clay with white slip, iron and copper pigments under transparent glaze  H: 3.5 W: 8.9 D: 8.9 cm   Kyoto, Japan

Oribe-style incense container with design of kudzu 18th century Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743) Edo period Buff clay with white slip, iron and copper pigments under transparent glaze H: 3.5 W: 8.9 D: 8.9 cm Kyoto, Japan

Japanese Art, Oribe-style incense container, Ogata Kenzan, (1663-1743) Edo period

Japanese Art, Oribe-style incense container, Ogata Kenzan, (1663-1743) Edo period

Kenzan-style incense burner with design of camellia late 18th to early 19th century Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743) Edo period Buff clay; white slip, iron and cobalt...

Kenzan-style incense burner with design of camellia late 18th to early 19th century Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743) Edo period Buff clay; white slip, iron and cobalt...

Fitzwilliam Museum - Ogata Kenzan hand built and faceted stoneware incense container base and lid has a light buff body, with an iron slip; a darker buff glaze is followed by pine tree decoration in brown iron, and white on the lid. Kyoto, Japan, 17th/18th century

Fitzwilliam Museum - Ogata Kenzan hand built and faceted stoneware incense container base and lid has a light buff body, with an iron slip; a darker buff glaze is followed by pine tree decoration in brown iron, and white on the lid. Kyoto, Japan, 17th/18th century

Tea bowl with design of cranes and chrysanthemums, early 18th century.   Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743). Edo period. Buff clay; white slip, iron and cobalt pigments under transparent glaze. H: 7.2 W: 10.4 D: 10.4 cm. Kyoto, Japan. The combination of crane and chrysanthemum has two possible but interrelated nuances. First, it is an auspicious combination, symbolize longevity. Second, may refer to poems of birds and flowers of the twelve months by Kamakura period poet Fujiwara Teika.

Tea bowl with design of cranes and chrysanthemums, early 18th century. Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743). Edo period. Buff clay; white slip, iron and cobalt pigments under transparent glaze. H: 7.2 W: 10.4 D: 10.4 cm. Kyoto, Japan. The combination of crane and chrysanthemum has two possible but interrelated nuances. First, it is an auspicious combination, symbolize longevity. Second, may refer to poems of birds and flowers of the twelve months by Kamakura period poet Fujiwara Teika.

Kenzan-style incense box in the shape of Mt. Kasuga  early 19th century    Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743)   Edo period     Light brown clay; white slip, iron pigment, and enamels under transparent lead glaze; enamels over glaze  H: 5.0 W: 5.6 cm   Tokyo, Japan

Kenzan-style incense box in the shape of Mt. Kasuga early 19th century Ogata Kenzan , (Japanese, 1663-1743) Edo period Light brown clay; white slip, iron pigment, and enamels under transparent lead glaze; enamels over glaze H: 5.0 W: 5.6 cm Tokyo, Japan

Porcelain small plates by OGATA Kenzan (1663-1743), Japan.

Porcelain small plates by OGATA Kenzan (1663-1743), Japan.

Tea bowl with design of pampas grass, by Ogata Kenzan (1663–1743) - The Kenzan Style in Japanese Ceramics

Tea bowl with design of pampas grass, by Ogata Kenzan (1663–1743) - The Kenzan Style in Japanese Ceramics

Kenzan-style Tea bowl with design of bamboo  late 19th century    Kyoto workshop, imitation   Meiji era     Buff clay; iron pigment under transparent glaze  H: 7.5 W: 12.0 cm   Kyoto, Japan

Kenzan-style Tea bowl with design of bamboo late 19th century Kyoto workshop, imitation Meiji era Buff clay; iron pigment under transparent glaze H: 7.5 W: 12.0 cm Kyoto, Japan

Square dish with bamboo grass design.  late 18th to early 19th century, Kyoto, Japan, by artist Ogata Kenzan.  Gift of Charles Lang Freer . Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Square dish with bamboo grass design. late 18th to early 19th century, Kyoto, Japan, by artist Ogata Kenzan. Gift of Charles Lang Freer . Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

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