Explore Midwifery, African Americans and more!

U.S. History of Black Midwives Timeline (ICTC)

History of Black Midwives Timeline – International Center for Traditional Childbearing (ICTC)

Two African American midwives, Leon County, Florida, circa 1944.

For all of your tireless work, cooking, washing, ironing and raising your family and other people's children; we salute you.strong black women who helped "raise" this nation.

Midwife.

"Aunt Dora Queen" a Midwife in Eufaula, Alabama, circa,

Sibby Kelly- born a slave and was a midwife in Georgia

Sibby Kelly- born a slave and was a midwife in Georgia.

Home birth in the Black Granny midwife tradition

While the media goes berserk over a royal baby in England, LIFE focuses on a heroic South Carolina nurse and midwife named Maude Callen.

Her name is Frances Wilson and she was a Freedom Rider.    Frances, a 23 year old student at Tennessee State University, was expelled for her participation in the Freedom Rides along with 14 other students. In 2008, the expelled students all received honorary doctorates from Tennessee State University. Frances received her honorary degree in 2011.

Frances Wilson, Frances, a 23 year old student at Tennessee State University, was expelled for her participation in the Freedom Rides along with 14 other students. In the expelled students.

Jessie Redmon Fauset  Coined as one of the “midwives” of the Harlem Renaissance by poet Langston Hughes

Jessie Redmon Fauset Coined as one of the “midwives” of the Harlem Renaissance by poet Langston Hughes

Mrs. Phillips, Midwife    Many African Americans who migrated west after the Civil War achieved a level of financial independence that seemed nearly impossible elsewhere. Mrs. Phillips worked as a midwife in Wyoming. Another woman, Sarah Gammon, earned recognition as the first career woman in Virginia City, Montana. Born a slave in North Carolina, Gammon purchased the majority of the city's water system with her husband. She kept the books, billed customers, and controlled expenses.

Phillips, Midwife (Wyoming State Archives) Many African Americans who migrated west after the Civil War achieved a level of financial independence that seemed nearly impossible elsewhere. Phillips is dressed as a prosperous lady.

Labor scene among the Wakambas (western portion of Central Africa). Imags from the History of Medicine (NLM) #childbirth #midwifery #history

Labor scene among the Wakambas (western portion of Central Africa). Imags from the History of Medicine (NLM)

W. Eugene Smith’s ‘Nurse Midwife’

Eugene Smith, Maude Callen carrying crying baby up brick steps, 1951

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