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WDIV Detroit: June 28, 1990: Mandela at Tiger Stadium #1

Originally aired on Thursday evening, June WDIV is the NBC affiliate in Detroit and this is a special broadcast of the News 4 Nightbeat.

Major Charity Adams Early, the first African American woman commissioned as an officer in the Women's Army Corps

Charity Adams Earley, Black Pioneer in Wacs, Dies at 83

Major Charity Edna Adams Earley was the first African American woman to be an officer in the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (later WACS) and was the commanding officer of the first battalion of African American women to serve overseas during World War II.

daydreams-of-a-matriarchist: “ The Branks, also sometimes called Dame’s Bridle, or Scold’s Bridle comprised of a metal facial mask and spiked mouth depressor that was implemented on housewives up.

WDIV News with John Blunt & Jennifer Moore 1979

A few minutes from a 1979 News 4 broadcast, anchored by John Blunt and Jennifer Moore.

WDIV Detroit: June 28, 1990: Mandela at Tiger Stadium #2

Originally aired on Thursday evening, June WDIV is the NBC affiliate in Detroit and this is a special broadcast of the News 4 Nightbeat.

Mary Church Terrell, ca. 1920.  Suffragette, co-founder of the National Association of Colored Women, and president of the Women's Republican League during Warren G. Harding's 1920 presidential campaign.

Every month is Black History Month at Vintage Black Glamour, so I’m just going to keep doing business as usual here. This is educator, writer, activist Mary Church Terrell. Born in Memphis, Tennessee to wealthy parents who were former slaves (her.

Macon Bolling Allen was the first recorded licensed black lawyer in the US. He was a self-taught lawyer who gained his knowledge and legal skills by serving as an apprentice and law clerk to practicing lawyers in the pre-Civil War era. In 1868, Allen moved to South Carolina, where he became active in politics as a Republican. Allen became a partner in the first black law firm in the US. In 1872, he ran for secretary of state on a Republican ticket.

Macon Allen was the first African American licensed to practice law in the United States (Maine, He is believed to be the first to hold a judicial position (Massachusetts,

Family of Henrietta Lacks Reach Settlement, Gains Control Over HeLa Cell Research

Family of Henrietta Lacks Reach Settlement, Gains Control Over HeLa Cell Research

Women's History, African American History, Black History, Black Highlights, Black People, Real People, Famous People, Famous Women, African American Women

Charged with the 1974 murder of a white jailer, Joan Little was ultimately acquitted on Aug. 15, 1975. Her defense claimed that Little, who was in prison at the time, had stabbed the jailer with an ice pick in defense when he assaulted her sexually.  Little became the first woman in the United States, regardless of race, to be acquitted using the defense that she used deadly force to prevent sexual assault.

Joanne Little August 1975 Joanne Little acquitted of murder charges in the August killing of a white jailer. The defense said she stabbed the jailer with an ice pick after he made sexual advances.

Sarah Ford

Sarah Ford : Federal Writers' Project : Free Download & Streaming

Sarah Ford - Born on the Kit Patton plantation (Varner-Hogg Plantation) near West Columbia, Texas, Sarah was probably about fifteen years old when emancipated.

Fearless Mentor Williams Born April 20, 1882 his father named him Fearless because he looked him straight in the eyes right after he was born! The name served the honorable man well. He had a long career with the BO Railroad He was a leader in Baltimore's African-American community and a trustee of Provident Hospital. He was also uncle to Thurgood Marshall, first African American Supreme Court Justice. He retired on June 15, 1952 with nearly 46 years of service with the BO.

Fearless Mentor Williams Born April 20, 1882 his father named him Fearless because he looked him straight in the eyes right after he was born! The name served the honorable man well. He had a long career with the BO Railroad He was a leader in Baltimore's African-American community and a trustee of Provident Hospital. He was also uncle to Thurgood Marshall, first African American Supreme Court Justice. He retired on June 15, 1952 with nearly 46 years of service with the BO.

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