Archdale Castle Folly Dromard and Glenross, Ireland

Archdale Castle Folly Dromard and Glenross, Ireland

Mow Cop Castle is a folly at Mow Cop, near Harriseahead in the county of Staffordshire, England. Traces of a prehistoric camp have been found here, but in 1754, Randle Wilbraham of nearby Rode Hall built an elaborate summerhouse looking like a medieval fortress and round tower.

Mow Cop Castle is a folly at Mow Cop, near Harriseahead in the county of Staffordshire, England. Traces of a prehistoric camp have been found here, but in 1754, Randle Wilbraham of nearby Rode Hall built an elaborate summerhouse looking like a medieval fortress and round tower.

Irish Folly

Irish Folly

Clytha Castle is a folly near Clytha between Llanarth and Raglan in Monmouthshire, south east Wales. One of the two "outstanding examples of late eighteenth century fanciful Gothic in the county",[1]"this stupendous folly enjoys magnificent views to the mountains of the north-west, Skirrid and Sugar Loaf."[2] The castle is a Grade I listed building as of 1 September 1956.[3]

Clytha Castle is a folly near Clytha between Llanarth and Raglan in Monmouthshire, south east Wales. One of the two "outstanding examples of late eighteenth century fanciful Gothic in the county",[1]"this stupendous folly enjoys magnificent views to the mountains of the north-west, Skirrid and Sugar Loaf."[2] The castle is a Grade I listed building as of 1 September 1956.[3]

The Triangular Lodge:    A folly, designed and constructed between 1593 and 1597 by Sir Thomas Tresham near Rushton, Northamptonshire, England. Tresham was a Roman Catholic and was imprisoned for a total of fifteen years in the late 16th century for refusing to become a Protestant. On his release in 1593, he designed the Lodge as a protestation of his faith. His belief in the Holy Trinity is represented everywhere in the Lodge by the number three: it has three walls 33 feet long, each with…

The Triangular Lodge: A folly, designed and constructed between 1593 and 1597 by Sir Thomas Tresham near Rushton, Northamptonshire, England. Tresham was a Roman Catholic and was imprisoned for a total of fifteen years in the late 16th century for refusing to become a Protestant. On his release in 1593, he designed the Lodge as a protestation of his faith. His belief in the Holy Trinity is represented everywhere in the Lodge by the number three: it has three walls 33 feet long, each with…

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