Explore British Museum, The Queen and more!

7dd8acb137bbec45748fb75b48e957bd.jpg (564×752)

7dd8acb137bbec45748fb75b48e957bd.jpg (564×752)

“Lilith’s themes are freedom, courage, playfulness, passion, pleasure and sexuality.  Her symbol is an apple.  In Hebrew legends, Lilith is a dangerously beautiful Goddess who refused t…

Goddess Lilith

The ’Queen of the Night’ Relief, also known as the Burney Relief.  Old Babylonian, 1800-1750 BC. Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London.  The Queen of the Night, renamed by the British Museum after their purchase of the artifact in 2003, this relief is one of the most recognizable ancient Mesopotamian artworks discovered to date. It originates from Southern Iraq, though the exact site in which it was found is unknown, as the relief was not archaeologically excavated…

Lilith: Burney Relief: Mesopotamian plaque, about BCE, depicting Lilith or Inanna or Ereshkigal

uulemnts:    elektrik667:  The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war or Ishtars sister and rival the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld or the demoness Lilitu known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine.   Old Babylonian era 1800-1750 BCE from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown) Mesopotamia Iraq. (The British Museum London).

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar's sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu.

The 'Queen of the Night' Relief, possibly a representation of the goddess Ishtar. It might also be her sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. Old Babylonian, 1800-1750 BC, from southern Iraq.  Source: © The Trustees of the British Museum

The 'Queen of the Night' Relief, Old Babylonian, B., 49 x 37 x baked straw-tempered clay © The Trustees of the British Museum

Famous relief from the Old Babylonian period (now in the British museum) called the “Burney relief” or “Queen of the Night relief”. The depicted figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war. However, her bird-feet and accompanying owls have suggested to some a connection with Lilitu (called Lilith in the Bible), though seemingly not the usual demonic Lilitu. 19th C. BC - 18th C. BC:

Famous relief from the Old Babylonian period (now in the British museum) called the “Burney relief” or “Queen of the Night relief”. The depicted figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war. However, her bir

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine.   Old Babylonian era, 1800-1750 BCE, from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London)

ancient-mesopotamia: “ The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the.

Mythic in her lifelike detail, this little pewter harpy hangs from a length of vegan suede in your choice of colours. She grips a full moon of moonstone in her talons, wound around with antiqued copper. She resembles Lilith in the Burney relief at the British Museum-- she is also known as the Queen of the Night. Necklace is 30 long with an adjustable knot. Please choose the colour of suede you would like from the drop down menu.

Night Queen Harpy Necklace. Siren Daemon with Moonstone. Lilith's Daughter

Mythic in her lifelike detail, this little pewter harpy hangs from a length of vegan suede in your choice of colours. She grips a full moon of moonstone in her talons, wound around with antiqued copper. She resembles Lilith in the Burney relief at the British Museum-- she is also known as the Queen of the Night. Necklace is 30 long with an adjustable knot. Please choose the colour of suede you would like from the drop down menu.

Night Queen Harpy Necklace. Siren Daemon with Moonstone. Lilith's Daughter

The Queen of the Night. An ancient Mesopotamian goddess, possibly Ishtar, goddess of sexual love and war, or perhaps her sister and rival Ereshkigal, who ruled the underworld. This plaque of baked clay tempered with straw was originally painted, with the goddess in red. She holds the rod and ring of justice, with the entire scene atop a scaly pattern representing mountains. It was originally housed in a small shrine. Babylonian, 18th Century BC. The British Museum

Some Iconic Near Eastern Antiquities in The British Museum

The ’Queen of the Night’ Relief, also known as the Burney Relief. Old Babylonian, BC. Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. The Queen of the Night, renamed by the.

Pinterest
Search