Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Explore Illustration Men, Editorial Illustration and more!

from nytimes.com

Book Review

It took me four years to get around to reading it but this is a book I return to again and again. It haunts me despite the fact that it was no easy read with the author's style of zip on punctuation.

margaret atwood's the blind assassin is 100 percent weird, but i loved it. it opens with these words: "ten days after the war ended, my sister laura drove a car off a bridge." they are spoken by iris, whose terse account of her sister's death in 1945 is followed by an inquest report proclaiming the death accidental. but just as the reader expects to settle into laura's story, atwood introduces a novel-within-a-novel, and there ensues the weirdness: a science fiction story told by two unnamed…

from nytimes.com

Unaccustomed Earth - Jhumpa Lahiri - Book Review

jhumpa lahiri's unaccustomed earth. achingly beautiful, yet simple, with eight short stories - the last three sort of a novella - of bengali immigrants and their american-reared children.

Must have for aspiring non-fiction self publishers: http://eyeonlifemag.com/eye-on-writing/interview-with-non-fiction-author-lis-sowerbutts

life of pi by yann martel was recommended to me by a congressional candidate i worked for in 2006. the son of a zookeeper, pi patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. when he's is sixteen, his family emigrates from india to north america aboard a japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes, but the ship sinks. pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and a 450-pound…

sphere by michael chrichton is one of the few scifi books i've read multiple times. in the middle of the south pacific, a thousand feet below the surface, a huge vessel is discovered resting on the ocean floor. it is a spaceship of phenomenal dimensions, apparently undamaged by its fall from the sky. and, most startling, it appears to be at least three hundred years old. but even more fantastic—and frightening—is what waits inside.