5. Roman - Gravestone with funerary banquet [Excavated at Palmyra, Syria] (02.29.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

5. Roman - Gravestone with funerary banquet [Excavated at Palmyra, Syria] (02.29.1) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

A PALMYRENE LIMESTONE BUST OF A WOMAN   Circa Mid 2nd Century A.D. *In the mid 1st century AD, Palmyra, a wealthy and elegant city located along the caravan routes linking Persia with the Mediterranean ports of Roman Syria and Phoenicia, came under Roman control. A period of great prosperity followed.

A PALMYRENE LIMESTONE BUST OF A WOMAN Circa Mid 2nd Century A.D. *In the mid 1st century AD, Palmyra, a wealthy and elegant city located along the caravan routes linking Persia with the Mediterranean ports of Roman Syria and Phoenicia, came under Roman control. A period of great prosperity followed.

Roman funerary relief of a woman and daughter, from Syria (1st century CE) -- The Greek inscription reads: "Mimia, too soon, farewell; Koartilla farewell" The mother wears native Mesopotamian costume; the daughter holds a wreath and wears fashionable Roman jewelry.  On display at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Roman funerary relief of a woman and daughter, from Syria (1st century CE) -- The Greek inscription reads: "Mimia, too soon, farewell; Koartilla farewell" The mother wears native Mesopotamian costume; the daughter holds a wreath and wears fashionable Roman jewelry. On display at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Zenobia;  240–275;  Zenobia was a 3rd-century Queen of the Palmyrene Empire in Roman Syria. She led a famous revolt against the Roman Empire. Zenobia became queen of the Palmyrene Empire following Odaenathus' death in 267. By 269, Zenobia had expanded the empire, conquering Egypt and expelling the Roman prefect, Tenagino Probus, who was beheaded after he led an attempt to recapture the territory. She ruled over Egypt until 274, when she was defeated and taken as a hostage to Rome.

Zenobia; 240–275; Zenobia was a 3rd-century Queen of the Palmyrene Empire in Roman Syria. She led a famous revolt against the Roman Empire. Zenobia became queen of the Palmyrene Empire following Odaenathus' death in 267. By 269, Zenobia had expanded the empire, conquering Egypt and expelling the Roman prefect, Tenagino Probus, who was beheaded after he led an attempt to recapture the territory. She ruled over Egypt until 274, when she was defeated and taken as a hostage to Rome.

Funerary stela from Palmyra, gilded and painted limestone, 3d c. CE, Oriental Museum, Rome

Funerary stela from Palmyra, gilded and painted limestone, 3d c. CE, Oriental Museum, Rome

Funerary Relief of a Woman and Two Children, c. AD 150 Sculpture , Bust Roman , 2nd century AD Roman period, Middle Imperial, 98-235 AD Creation Place: Palmyra (Syria) Limestone

Funerary Relief of a Woman and Two Children, c. AD 150 Sculpture , Bust Roman , 2nd century AD Roman period, Middle Imperial, 98-235 AD Creation Place: Palmyra (Syria) Limestone

Marble statues, 2nd century AD (photo). Palmyra Museum, Syria / De Agostini Picture Library / C. Sappa / The Bridgeman Art Library

Marble statues, 2nd century AD (photo). Palmyra Museum, Syria / De Agostini Picture Library / C. Sappa / The Bridgeman Art Library

Celtic musicians. Music is thought to have played a powerful role in early Scotland.  This 10th century carving from Lethendy Tower in Perthshire shows Pictish harp, Irish pipes and drum.

Celtic musicians. Music is thought to have played a powerful role in early Scotland. This 10th century carving from Lethendy Tower in Perthshire shows Pictish harp, Irish pipes and drum.

Funerary relief (stone). Roman, (3rd century AD) / Palmyra Museum, Syria / De Agostini Picture Library / C. Sappa / The Bridgeman Art Library

Funerary relief (stone). Roman, (3rd century AD) / Palmyra Museum, Syria / De Agostini Picture Library / C. Sappa / The Bridgeman Art Library

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