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Everyone must remember that “Mt. Rushmore” (the Black Hills) does not legally belong to the federal government, and especially not to South Dakota. It was acknowledged as belonging to the sovereign Lakota Nation in the Sioux Treaty of 1868. The federal government STOLE the Hills from the Lakota, breaking the law they wrote with their own hands! The US is a repeat criminal but no one holds them accountable!

The Cherokee never had princesses. This is a concept based on European folktales and has no reality in Cherokee history and culture. In fact, Cherokee women were very powerful. They owned all the houses and fields, and they could marry and divorce as they pleased. Kinship was determined through the mother's line. Clan mothers administered justice in many matters. Beloved women were very special women chosen for their outstanding qualities. As in other aspects of Cherokee culture, there was a…

Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Seattle. Born 1820 in what is now Rainier Beach. After the 1855 treaty when all Native Americans had to leave Seattle; Angeline remained in a small waterfront cabin on Western Avenue, near what is now the Pike Place Market, selling handwoven baskets at Ye Olde Curiosity Shop.

Rose White Thunder, Daughter of Sioux Chief White Thunder, in Elk Tooth Dress, Carlisle (1883 - 1887) Image from J. N. Choate, photographer, Carlisle, Pa.

Badlands & Black Hills of South Dakota

Badlands & Black Hills of South Dakota: Travel Overview #visitrapidcity @Patricia Smith Nickens Derryberry Rapid City