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July, 29 1991, Physician Bernard A. Harris, Jr. becomes an astronaut. On February 9, 1995, he became the first African American to perform an extra-vehicular activity (spacewalk), during the second of his two Space Shuttle flights.

July, 29 1991, Physician Bernard A. Harris, Jr. becomes an astronaut. On February 9, 1995, he became the first African American to perform an extra-vehicular activity (spacewalk), during the second of his two Space Shuttle flights.

USING BLACK BABIES AS BAIT.  "they would steal the babies during the course of the day, -some would be infants, some would be a yr old, some would be toddlers- they would grab these children, take them down to the swamp & leave them in pens like little chicken coops. At night, they'd take these babies, tie them up, put a rope around their neck & torso & tie it tight- They would throw in the babies, in a matter of minutes, alligator would clamp his jaws on that child, he was swallowed"

USING BLACK BABIES AS BAIT. "they would steal the babies during the course of the day, -some would be infants, some would be a yr old, some would be toddlers- they would grab these children, take them down to the swamp & leave them in pens like little chicken coops. At night, they'd take these babies, tie them up, put a rope around their neck & torso & tie it tight- They would throw in the babies, in a matter of minutes, alligator would clamp his jaws on that child, he was swallowed"

Amanda Berry Smith was born enslaved January 23, 1837. Smith became well known for her beautiful voice and evangelized throughout the South and the West. In 1876, she was invited to speak and sing in England and ended up staying for a year and a half conducting religious services. After her return to the United States, she founded the Amanda Smith Orphan’s Home for African American children in a suburb of Chicago, Illinois.

Amanda Berry Smith was born enslaved January 23, 1837. Smith became well known for her beautiful voice and evangelized throughout the South and the West. In 1876, she was invited to speak and sing in England and ended up staying for a year and a half conducting religious services. After her return to the United States, she founded the Amanda Smith Orphan’s Home for African American children in a suburb of Chicago, Illinois.

Betsey Stockton (c. 1798–1865) was an African American educator and missionary born into slavery in Princeton, NJ. She gained her freedom at 20 and travelled to Hawaii, Canada and Philadelphia teaching and serving as a nurse. She moved back to Princeton in 1835 and spent the rest of her life enriching the lives of the members of the local African American community. There is a window memorialized to her in the Witherspoon Street Church, Princeton, NJ.

Betsey Stockton (c. 1798–1865) was an African American educator and missionary born into slavery in Princeton, NJ. She gained her freedom at 20 and travelled to Hawaii, Canada and Philadelphia teaching and serving as a nurse. She moved back to Princeton in 1835 and spent the rest of her life enriching the lives of the members of the local African American community. There is a window memorialized to her in the Witherspoon Street Church, Princeton, NJ.

Audley Moore was born in New Iberia, Louisiana, on July 27, 1898. Her parents were both dead by the time she was 14, and she became the primary support for her two sisters. She worked as a nurse during World War I, and after moving to Anniston, Alabama, organized the first USO for African American soldiers who had been denied entrance by the official USO organization. She also assisted them in receiving medical care and food.

Audley Moore was born in New Iberia, Louisiana, on July 27, 1898. Her parents were both dead by the time she was 14, and she became the primary support for her two sisters. She worked as a nurse during World War I, and after moving to Anniston, Alabama, organized the first USO for African American soldiers who had been denied entrance by the official USO organization. She also assisted them in receiving medical care and food.

Caroline Still Wiley Anderson, (Wm. Still's daughter) educator and physician,   was born November 1, 1848 in Philadelphia, PA. In 1868, she graduated from Oberlin College, where she was the only black woman in her class, and returned to Philadelphia to teach. She later taught  at Howard U. She became a medical doctor in 1878 the state’s first black female doctor. She ran the Berean Dispensary which served poor women and children.  Berean Manual Training and Industrial School .

Caroline Still Wiley Anderson, (Wm. Still's daughter) educator and physician, was born November 1, 1848 in Philadelphia, PA. In 1868, she graduated from Oberlin College, where she was the only black woman in her class, and returned to Philadelphia to teach. She later taught at Howard U. She became a medical doctor in 1878 the state’s first black female doctor. She ran the Berean Dispensary which served poor women and children. Berean Manual Training and Industrial School .

1963 - The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed as an act of racially motivated terrorism. The explosion at the African-American church, kills four girls and marks a turning point in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. It helps build support for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

1963 - The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama was bombed as an act of racially motivated terrorism. The explosion at the African-American church, kills four girls and marks a turning point in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. It helps build support for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

♍ Edward Alexander Bouchet (9/15/1852-10/28/1918; New Haven, CT) was the 1st African American to earn a Ph.D. from an American university and the 1st AA to graduate from Yale University in 1874. He completed his dissertation in Yale's Ph.D. program in 1876 becoming the 1st AA to receive a Ph.D. (in any subject). His area of study was Physics. Bouchet was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. In 2005, Yale and Howard universities founded the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society in his name.

♍ Edward Alexander Bouchet (9/15/1852-10/28/1918; New Haven, CT) was the 1st African American to earn a Ph.D. from an American university and the 1st AA to graduate from Yale University in 1874. He completed his dissertation in Yale's Ph.D. program in 1876 becoming the 1st AA to receive a Ph.D. (in any subject). His area of study was Physics. Bouchet was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. In 2005, Yale and Howard universities founded the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society in his name.

Shorpy Historical Photo Archive: "Tuskegee Airmen" 332nd Fighter Group airmen at a briefing in Ramitelli, Italy. Foreground: Emile G. Clifton of San Francisco and Richard S. "Rip" Harder of Brooklyn. (Colorized Photo). March 1945.

Shorpy Historical Photo Archive: "Tuskegee Airmen" 332nd Fighter Group airmen at a briefing in Ramitelli, Italy. Foreground: Emile G. Clifton of San Francisco and Richard S. "Rip" Harder of Brooklyn. (Colorized Photo). March 1945.

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