Photo by Michael A Losicco

Photo by Michael A Losicco

Photo by Michael A Losicco

I have been asked a few times to put a tutorial together so here we go.This tutorial is also posted on my web.

After heat treatment, the first thing to be done is to clean up the blade pivot hole. This is done with a tool that Tony gets from MSC. He uses a 3/16" barrel lap tool and 600 grit Locktite Clover grinding compound. This polishes and rounds the pivot hole as good as it gets.

After heat treatment, the first thing to be done is to clean up the blade pivot hole. This is done with a tool that Tony gets from MSC. He uses a 3/16" barrel lap tool and 600 grit Locktite Clover grinding compound. This polishes and rounds the pivot hole as good as it gets.

Use tape to temporarily secure the bushing stationary with the tang. Stake the bushing lightly in four places with an automatic center punch on both sides. These "dimples" will lock the bushing in place with the liners and keep it from ever turning. Tony says he has seen these marks transferred to the harder liner material on knives he has disassembled

Use tape to temporarily secure the bushing stationary with the tang. Stake the bushing lightly in four places with an automatic center punch on both sides. These "dimples" will lock the bushing in place with the liners and keep it from ever turning. Tony says he has seen these marks transferred to the harder liner material on knives he has disassembled

Sand the spring with 180 grit sandpaper taped to a perfectly flat surface, in this example a 9x12 granite bench plate.

Sand the spring with 180 grit sandpaper taped to a perfectly flat surface, in this example a granite bench plate.

The idea here is to have just enough of the tube sticking up to create a "rivet" to hold the knife together in the rear. The spinner pressure needs to create more of a "downward force" than a"outward force" or else you would easily crack the handle material. You can rotate the knife while pressure is on to get a feel for your progress.  Make sure that you aren't trying to flair over too much material above the handles. If you need to, remove the knife from the vise and remove some of the…

The idea here is to have just enough of the tube sticking up to create a "rivet" to hold the knife together in the rear. The spinner pressure needs to create more of a "downward force" than a"outward force" or else you would easily crack the handle material. You can rotate the knife while pressure is on to get a feel for your progress. Make sure that you aren't trying to flair over too much material above the handles. If you need to, remove the knife from the vise and remove some of the…

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