Martin Pienaar

Martin Pienaar

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Martin Pienaar
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NYT Cooking: This grilled broccoli is dressed simply in tamari, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. It results in crisp-tender florets that are beautifully sweet and salty beneath the smoke.

NYT Cooking: This grilled broccoli is dressed simply in tamari, olive oil and balsamic vinegar. It results in crisp-tender florets that are beautifully sweet and salty beneath the smoke.

NYT Cooking: This savory-sweet treatment for pork tenderloin was brought to The Times in 1989 by the inimitable Marian Burros. With just five ingredients — pork, brown sugar, whole-grain mustard, rosemary and sherry — you have an extremely simple though supremely satisfying dish. We like ours served with mashed sweet potatoes and a pile of sautéed greens, and the leftovers make great sandwiches.

NYT Cooking: This savory-sweet treatment for pork tenderloin was brought to The Times in 1989 by the inimitable Marian Burros. With just five ingredients — pork, brown sugar, whole-grain mustard, rosemary and sherry — you have an extremely simple though supremely satisfying dish. We like ours served with mashed sweet potatoes and a pile of sautéed greens, and the leftovers make great sandwiches.

NYT Cooking: In the south Indian state of Kerala, a street stall selling food is called a thattukada, and one of the most well-known dishes served is something called chicken fry, or thattu chicken. The chef Asha Gomez, who grew up in the Kerala port city of Trivandrum and now lives in Atlanta, took that street chicken and adapted it into a quick-cooking recipe that relies on coconut oil for crispness, and ...

NYT Cooking: In the south Indian state of Kerala, a street stall selling food is called a thattukada, and one of the most well-known dishes served is something called chicken fry, or thattu chicken. The chef Asha Gomez, who grew up in the Kerala port city of Trivandrum and now lives in Atlanta, took that street chicken and adapted it into a quick-cooking recipe that relies on coconut oil for crispness, and ...

NYT Cooking: The easy-to-memorize marinade for this fast broiled salmon hits all the right notes: salty, sweet and sour. The fish emerges from the oven with caramelized, crisp skin, which contrasts nicely with a salad of fresh herbs tossed with sesame oil and rice wine vinegar. Close contact with the intense heat will help crisp up the skin, while keeping the rest of the fish tender and flaky. To avoid over...

NYT Cooking: The easy-to-memorize marinade for this fast broiled salmon hits all the right notes: salty, sweet and sour. The fish emerges from the oven with caramelized, crisp skin, which contrasts nicely with a salad of fresh herbs tossed with sesame oil

NYT Cooking: Your typical sheet-pan chicken recipe roasts everything together on a pan at once. This version pairs potatoes with the poultry, and tops everything off with fresh herbs and arugula, making it a true one-pan meal, salad included. A savory yogurt sauce adds a creamy touch, but it’s optional if you’re not a yogurt sauce fan. Feel free to double the recipe if you’re feeding a crowd, though make su...

Your typical sheet-pan chicken recipe roasts everything together on a pan at once This version pairs potatoes with the poultry, and tops everything off with fresh herbs and arugula, making it a true one-pan meal, salad included A savory yogurt sauce adds

NYT Cooking: The curative powers of raw meat are often cited and frequently lampooned — I’m thinking of the guy slumped back in his chair, after the brawl, with a fat raw steak on his mangled black eye. I can’t speak to that, but a hand-chopped mound of cold raw beef, seasoned perfectly, at around 3 o’clock in the afternoon on New Year’s Day, with a cold glass of the hair of the Champagne dog that bit you t...

NYT Cooking: The curative powers of raw meat are often cited and frequently lampooned — I’m thinking of the guy slumped back in his chair, after the brawl, with a fat raw steak on his mangled black eye. I can’t speak to that, but a hand-chopped mound of cold raw beef, seasoned perfectly, at around 3 o’clock in the afternoon on New Year’s Day, with a cold glass of the hair of the Champagne dog that bit you t...

Ride the most epic trails - Ride2Nowhere

Ride the most epic trails - Ride2Nowhere

NYT Cooking: This Italian-American comfort food recipe came to The Times in 1993 in one of Pierre Franey's beloved “60-Minute Gourmet” columns. His version of the classic casserole calls for slices of pork loin, a “lean, moist and versatile” option, Mr. Franey said, which are pounded thin then breaded and pan-fried until golden. A simple tomato sauce of canned crushed tomatoes, onions, garlic and oregano co...

NYT Cooking: This Italian-American comfort food recipe came to The Times in 1993 in one of Pierre Franey's beloved “60-Minute Gourmet” columns. His version of the classic casserole calls for slices of pork loin, a “lean, moist and versatile” option, Mr. Franey said, which are pounded thin then breaded and pan-fried until golden. A simple tomato sauce of canned crushed tomatoes, onions, garlic and oregano co...

NYT Cooking: This 2006 recipe came to The Times by way of David Myers, the American chef and restaurateur, when Amanda Hesser called upon him to re-interpret this 1961 Times recipe for Chinese barbecued spareribs. He kept the simple soy-garlic-ketchup (yes, ketchup) marinade intact and applied it to salmon. He then served it with a preserved ginger relish and a cucumber salad seasoned with shichimi togarash...

NYT Cooking: This 2006 recipe came to The Times by way of David Myers, the American chef and restaurateur, when Amanda Hesser called upon him to re-interpret this 1961 Times recipe for Chinese barbecued spareribs. He kept the simple soy-garlic-ketchup (yes, ketchup) marinade intact and applied it to salmon. He then served it with a preserved ginger relish and a cucumber salad seasoned with shichimi togarash...

NYT Cooking: This recipe, adapted from Roberta’s, the pizza and hipster haute-cuisine utopia in Bushwick, Brooklyn, provides a delicate, extraordinarily flavorful dough that will last in the refrigerator for up to a week. It rewards close attention to weight rather than volume in the matter of the ingredients, and asks for a mixture of finely ground Italian pizza flour (designated “00” on the bags and avail...

Roberta’s Pizza Dough Recipe