When taking photographs at night be particularly vigilant in using a bean bag. Canon 7D with an EF 100mm f2.8 Macro shot at 1/2500 sec at f2.8, ISO 2000 – Photographed by Kate Neill

When taking photographs at night be particularly vigilant in using a bean bag. Canon 7D with an EF 100mm f2.8 Macro shot at 1/2500 sec at f2.8, ISO 2000 – Photographed by Kate Neill

A giant legless skink peers out of the sand in the Mhangeni drainage. Although at first glance easily confused with a snake, these animals are in fact lizards. Photograph by James Tyrrell.

A giant legless skink peers out of the sand in the Mhangeni drainage. Although at first glance easily confused with a snake, these animals are in fact lizards. Photograph by James Tyrrell.

The incredible camouflage that some animals display never ceases to amaze me. Barely a week goes by in which I don't see a new grasshopper or praying mantis species I have never seen before, some of them with bizzarre leaf-like appendages, funny growths, and all manner of fascinating adaptations designed to enhance their cryptic nature. Look at how closely this grasshopper resembles a collection of small stones and mud.

The incredible camouflage that some animals display never ceases to amaze me. Barely a week goes by in which I don't see a new grasshopper or praying mantis species I have never seen before, some of them with bizzarre leaf-like appendages, funny growths, and all manner of fascinating adaptations designed to enhance their cryptic nature. Look at how closely this grasshopper resembles a collection of small stones and mud.

Two scrub hare leverets suckle in as dusk turns to night. Photograph by Andrea Campbell.

Two scrub hare leverets suckle in as dusk turns to night. Photograph by Andrea Campbell.

A young puff adder feasts on what looks like a type of robin. This snake has cytotoxic venom, which results in necrosis of the flesh. Despite not being the most venomous snake, it is responsible for more bites and fatalities in Africa than any other snake due to its habit of not moving away from approaching footsteps. Instead it blows out air as a warning, hence the name puff adder. Photograph by Amy Attenborough

A young puff adder feasts on what looks like a type of robin. This snake has cytotoxic venom, which results in necrosis of the flesh. Despite not being the most venomous snake, it is responsible for more bites and fatalities in Africa than any other snake due to its habit of not moving away from approaching footsteps. Instead it blows out air as a warning, hence the name puff adder. Photograph by Amy Attenborough

Summer is a time of babies, water, and lush vegetation but it is also a time of snakes. However to see a snake is very rare and on this occa...

Summer is a time of babies, water, and lush vegetation but it is also a time of snakes. However to see a snake is very rare and on this occa...

Watching Tree Agama's hatch from the sand in the Maxabeni river was a true highlight. Simon Smit

Watching Tree Agama's hatch from the sand in the Maxabeni river was a true highlight. Simon Smit

A Bark Spider sets itself up for the evening and begins the long wait for its first victim. Photograph by Simon Smit.

A Bark Spider sets itself up for the evening and begins the long wait for its first victim. Photograph by Simon Smit.

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