Erasmus Castle, Pretoria

The beloved old Victorian-style house (also known as Erasmus Castle) that has overlooked our city for more than a hundred years. The house was built in the early 20th Century by Jochemus and Johanna Erasmus, a self-made wealthy farming couple on their farm Garstfontein. In the 1970s it was expropriated by the South African government, which planned to build a new hospital on the property. This never materialised, and the house became more and more dilapidated over the next decade
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The home, with its 17 rooms, was built by Jochemus Erasmus in the early 1900s on Garstfontein farm, with his wife Johanna as the prime visionary. It was a time of much growth in the area, fed by the gold rush on the Witwatersrand.

Debunking the myth of the haunted house

The home, with its 17 rooms, was built by Jochemus Erasmus in the early on Garstfontein farm, with his wife Johanna as the prime visionary. It was a time of much growth in the area, fed by the gold rush on the Witwatersrand.

The Erasmuses, who were farmers, and had become one of the richer families in the Pretoria area, apparently dreamt of building a Victorian-style home of European opulence to rival the mansions springing up in Johannesburg. The couple commissioned Dutch architect Frans van der Ben to design the castle, and an Italian contractor, G. Monbello, to build it. The castle, which was known as Bella Vista (beautiful view), was completed in 1903. Only later did it become known as Erasmus Castle.

The Erasmuses, who were farmers, and had become one of the richer families in the Pretoria area, apparently dreamt of building a Victorian-style home of European opulence to rival the mansions springing up in Johannesburg. The couple commissioned Dutch architect Frans van der Ben to design the castle, and an Italian contractor, G. Monbello, to build it. The castle, which was known as Bella Vista (beautiful view), was completed in 1903. Only later did it become known as Erasmus Castle.

Smoking room - Again, the large windows would have let in plenty of light, and the heavy curtains would have been drawn in winter to keep the heat in the house. There is a secret door (barely visible) in the far wall, which leads to a large walk-in cupboard. I can just imagine the children using it as one of their favourite hide-and-seek hiding places. I would have if I’d lived in the house.

Smoking room - Again, the large windows would have let in plenty of light, and the heavy curtains would have been drawn in winter to keep the heat in the house. There is a secret door (barely visible) in the far wall, which leads to a large walk-in cupboard. I can just imagine the children using it as one of their favourite hide-and-seek hiding places. I would have if I’d lived in the house.

Sundial

Debunking the myth of the haunted house

Balcony and top floor

Debunking the myth of the haunted house

Front door

Debunking the myth of the haunted house

The bottom floor

Debunking the myth of the haunted house

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