Jasminumangulare .  (Wild Jasmine) is a species of jasmine, in the family Oleaceae that is indigenous to South Africa.  This scrambling climber can be grown in the sun or semi-shade. It produces masses of white, scented, star-shaped flowers and it attracts a variety of birds. This is one of around 10 species of Jasmine that naturally occur in South Africa.[1][2]

Jasminumangulare . (Wild Jasmine) is a species of jasmine, in the family Oleaceae that is indigenous to South Africa. This scrambling climber can be grown in the sun or semi-shade. It produces masses of white, scented, star-shaped flowers and it attracts a variety of birds. This is one of around 10 species of Jasmine that naturally occur in South Africa.[1][2]

Thunbergia alata.  Thunbergia alata has a vine habit, and can grow to a height of 6–8 ft (1.8-2.4 m) in tropical zones, or much less as a container plant or as an annual. The flowers have five petals and appear throughout the growing season. They typically are warm orange with a characteristic dark spot in the centre, although different varieties can be red, orange, red-orange, white, pale yellow, or bright yellow, with or without the characteristic chocolate-purple centre.

How to Grow Black-Eyed Susan Vine (Thunbergia Alata)

Pelargonium Peltatum.the common names ivy-leaf geranium and cascading geranium. It is native to southern Africa, particularly South Africa. It is commonly grown as an ornamental plant. This is a subshrub which can reach two meters in height, its branches prostrate, spreading, trailing, or climbing. The thin, somewhat succulent leaves are peltate, their petioles attached at the middle of the ivy-shaped leaf blades.

Pelargonium peltatum / Geraniaceae / Th (Ch) / gémorr

Aloe ciliaris They can be differentiated from other climbing aloes by the way that the soft, white, hair-like teeth (=ciliaris) that grow along the margins of the leaves, extend all the way around the stem, at the base of the leaf.  The fleshy leaves themselves are strongly recurved (helping to anchor the tall stems in dense thickets and assist the aloe in climbing). The leaf sheaths are conspicuously striped green and white.

Aloe ciliaris They can be differentiated from other climbing aloes by the way that the soft, white, hair-like teeth (=ciliaris) that grow along the margins of the leaves, extend all the way around the stem, at the base of the leaf. The fleshy leaves themselves are strongly recurved (helping to anchor the tall stems in dense thickets and assist the aloe in climbing). The leaf sheaths are conspicuously striped green and white.

Asparagus falcatus / Sicklethorn This local Asparagus species sends up long shoots (sometimes up to 7 meters high) from its base of roots and massive tubers. These shoots are initially soft and curl around branches or fences. However, they soon harden, and the downward-pointing thorns help to hook the tendril onto its support - as well as providing defence.  It produces fragrant white blossoms that are followed by bright red berries, each containing a shiny black seed.

Asparagus falcatus / Sicklethorn This local Asparagus species sends up long shoots (sometimes up to 7 meters high) from its base of roots and massive tubers. These shoots are initially soft and curl around branches or fences. However, they soon harden, and the downward-pointing thorns help to hook the tendril onto its support - as well as providing defence. It produces fragrant white blossoms that are followed by bright red berries, each containing a shiny black seed.

Clematis brachiata  commonly known as Traveller's Joy, is a hardy, deciduous South African liana belonging to the Ranunculaceae family.  It tends to clamber to the tops of trees and shrubs, sprawling over the crowns. Leaves are compound with from 1 to 7 leaflets. Attractive fragrant flowers appear in summer. Achenes are covered in fine silky hair.

Clematis brachiata commonly known as Traveller's Joy, is a hardy, deciduous South African liana belonging to the Ranunculaceae family. It tends to clamber to the tops of trees and shrubs, sprawling over the crowns. Leaves are compound with from 1 to 7 leaflets. Attractive fragrant flowers appear in summer. Achenes are covered in fine silky hair.

Senecio angulatus .  Senecio angulatus also known as Creeping groundsel[6] and sometimes as Cape ivy[7] is a climbing succulent perennial from the family Asteraceae of the genus Senecio; a native of South AfricaDescribed as scrambling[10] and as a twining herb[9] whose form is a dense tangled shrub 2 metres (6.6 ft) tall[14] or a climber to 6 metres (20 ft) high,[9] that can become an aggressive weed once established[

Senecio angulatus . Senecio angulatus also known as Creeping groundsel[6] and sometimes as Cape ivy[7] is a climbing succulent perennial from the family Asteraceae of the genus Senecio; a native of South AfricaDescribed as scrambling[10] and as a twining herb[9] whose form is a dense tangled shrub 2 metres (6.6 ft) tall[14] or a climber to 6 metres (20 ft) high,[9] that can become an aggressive weed once established[


More ideas
Pinterest
Search