NOAA Ocean Explorer / Okeanos Expedition & Earlier Expeditions

learn about, discover, and virtually explore the ocean realm.
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No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too.  Size matters Why do protected areas create more fish? The obvious answer is that, when protected from capture and imminent death, fish have more opportunities to reproduce. However, there could be a subtler but even more important reason: size matters.  Fish living in protected areas typically live longer and are consistently larger than fish in unprotected areas. Dr. Almany said that larger m       | Smithsonian Ocean…

Fish swim at a coral reef at Pearl and Hermes Atoll at Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, northwest of the main Hawaiian islands

WhaleAndCalf;   NOAA is working on a plan that could limit manmade noise undersea — and reduce the destruction it leaves in its wake. Reuters reports that NOAA is working on a 10-year plan scheduled to be released later in 2016 that will instate legal limits to the U.S.’s contributions to ocean noise, as well as collect important data that monitors how noise affects marine life.

great locations to whale watch: Kee Beach, Kukui O Lono Park at Kalaheo, Poipu Beach, Princeville, Mahaulepu and Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge.

A six gill shark paid us a visit, and even stuck around for a minute. Note the high diversity of coral species in the foreground. Look closely, and you can see brittle starfish hiding in in the corals.

A six gill shark swims by for a look at the remotely operated vehicle. Image courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas.

Several species of deep-sea corals form an underwater garden 165 m (540 ft) below the ocean’s surface off the coast of Alaska’s Aleutian Islands.

Several species of deep-sea corals form an underwater garden 165 m ft) below the ocean’s surface off the coast of Alaska’s Aleutian Islands.

NOAA's Ocean Service ‏@noaaocean 8/06/'16  Happy #WorldOceanDay! What do you know about our world ocean? #30DaysofOcean VIDEO: http://1.usa.gov/1O59FSt      World Oceans Day (@CelebrateOceans) | Twitter

NOAA's Ocean Service ‏@noaaocean 8/06/'16 Happy #WorldOceanDay! What do you know about our world ocean? #30DaysofOcean VIDEO: http://1.usa.gov/1O59FSt World Oceans Day (@CelebrateOceans) | Twitter

NOAA Ocean Today video: 'Marine Protected Areas'

NOAA Ocean Today video: 'Marine Protected Areas'

No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

Two large coral trout ( Plectropomus leopardus ) swim through a coral reef on Taveuni Island in Fiji.

The damage left by destructive fishing practices. One of the most pervasive, wasteful and destructive practices is the use of dynamite to blow up reefs, which kills all the fish within a 10-20 meter (30-60 foot) radius, and can severely injure those further away.  This is sad. Why are humans still so ignorant or is it just plain greed and lack of respect for nature!  Field Notes from the East African Coast | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

Field Notes from the East African Coast

AAn oblique-banded snapper (Pristipomoides zonatus) and moray eel (Gymnothorax berndti).

AAn oblique-banded snapper (Pristipomoides zonatus) and moray eel (Gymnothorax berndti).

An anemone, with tentacles getting blown over by the strong current, living on a manganese-encrusted rock. Note the light sediment layer on the rock.

An anemone in the Marianas Trench (NOAA -

An unknown sponge species. We don’t know what the white spots are that are embedded within the tissue, but speculate that it could be embryos.

An unknown sponge species. We don’t know what the white spots are that are embedded within the tissue, but speculate that it could be embryos.

A high-density field of corals, including the spiraling Iridogorgia magnispiralis (center), which can grow as long as five meters.

A high-density field of corals, including the spiraling Iridogorgia magnispiralis (center), which can grow as long as five meters.

The anemone living on this parapagurid hermit crab (likely Strobopagurus gracilipes) actually secretes a “shell” for the crab, which it inhabits instead of a gastropod shell (e.g., snail) that most hermit crabs call home.

The anemone living on this parapagurid hermit crab (likely Strobopagurus gracilipes) actually secretes a “shell” for the crab, which it inhabits instead of a gastropod shell (e., snail) that most hermit crabs call home.

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