NOAA Ocean Explorer / Okeanos Expedition & Earlier Expeditions

Rosh Ramnath
learn about, discover, and virtually explore the ocean realm.
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WhaleAndCalf;   NOAA is working on a plan that could limit manmade noise undersea — and reduce the destruction it leaves in its wake. Reuters reports that NOAA is working on a 10-year plan scheduled to be released later in 2016 that will instate legal limits to the U.S.’s contributions to ocean noise, as well as collect important data that monitors how noise affects marine life.

WhaleAndCalf; NOAA is working on a plan that could limit manmade noise undersea — and reduce the destruction it leaves in its wake. Reuters reports that NOAA is working on a 10-year plan scheduled to be released later in 2016 that will instate legal limits to the U.S.’s contributions to ocean noise, as well as collect important data that monitors how noise affects marine life.

NOAA's Ocean Service ‏@noaaocean 8/06/'16  Happy #WorldOceanDay! What do you know about our world ocean? #30DaysofOcean VIDEO: http://1.usa.gov/1O59FSt      World Oceans Day (@CelebrateOceans) | Twitter

Андрей Инк on

NOAA's Ocean Service ‏@noaaocean 8/06/'16 Happy #WorldOceanDay! What do you know about our world ocean? #30DaysofOcean VIDEO: http://1.usa.gov/1O59FSt World Oceans Day (@CelebrateOceans) | Twitter

the pristine marine wilderness of Palmyra Atoll   MPAtlas (@MPAtlas) | Twitter

the pristine marine wilderness of Palmyra Atoll MPAtlas (@MPAtlas) | Twitter

Why MPAs?    Marine protected areas are essential to safeguard biodiversity and to sustain vibrant seas.  Marine protected areas can increase biomass and biodiversity in tropical and temperate ecosystems, as well as serve as insurance policies against the impacts of fishing and other destructive activities. If managed properly, they are an effective way of protecting marine ecosystems along with their cultural and historical heritage for us and future generations.

Why MPAs? Marine protected areas are essential to safeguard biodiversity and to sustain vibrant seas. Marine protected areas can increase biomass and biodiversity in tropical and temperate ecosystems, as well as serve as insurance policies against the impacts of fishing and other destructive activities. If managed properly, they are an effective way of protecting marine ecosystems along with their cultural and historical heritage for us and future generations.

NOAA Ocean Today video: 'Marine Protected Areas'

NOAA Ocean Today video: 'Marine Protected Areas'

No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too.  Size matters Why do protected areas create more fish? The obvious answer is that, when protected from capture and imminent death, fish have more opportunities to reproduce. However, there could be a subtler but even more important reason: size matters.  Fish living in protected areas typically live longer and are consistently larger than fish in unprotected areas. Dr. Almany said that larger m       | Smithsonian Ocean…

No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too. Size matters Why do protected areas create more fish? The obvious answer is that, when protected from capture and imminent death, fish have more opportunities to reproduce. However, there could be a subtler but even more important reason: size matters. Fish living in protected areas typically live longer and are consistently larger than fish in unprotected areas. Dr. Almany said that larger m | Smithsonian Ocean…

No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

No-Take Marine Protected Areas: Having Your Fish and Eating Them Too | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

The damage left by destructive fishing practices. One of the most pervasive, wasteful and destructive practices is the use of dynamite to blow up reefs, which kills all the fish within a 10-20 meter (30-60 foot) radius, and can severely injure those further away.  This is sad. Why are humans still so ignorant or is it just plain greed and lack of respect for nature!  Field Notes from the East African Coast | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

The damage left by destructive fishing practices. One of the most pervasive, wasteful and destructive practices is the use of dynamite to blow up reefs, which kills all the fish within a 10-20 meter (30-60 foot) radius, and can severely injure those further away. This is sad. Why are humans still so ignorant or is it just plain greed and lack of respect for nature! Field Notes from the East African Coast | Smithsonian Ocean Portal

AAn oblique-banded snapper (Pristipomoides zonatus) and moray eel (Gymnothorax berndti).

AAn oblique-banded snapper (Pristipomoides zonatus) and moray eel (Gymnothorax berndti).

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