Black+Decker DIY Inspiration competition

Enter the BLACK+DECKER DIY Inspiration competition and stand a chance to win a BLACK+DECKER hamper and a night away at Protea Hotel Fire&Ice! Melrose Arch, valued at R20 000! How to enter: 1) Take before and after pictures of your DIY project. 2) Post your pictures to our Facebook page with a description of the project and including our hashtag #BLACKDECKERDIY. Alternatively, images and the description can be emailed to competitions@granddesignslive.co.za
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We're so excited by some of the #BlackDeckerDIY entries we've received this week: A pallet to aquarium stand, installation of new cupboards and rain gutter bookshelves.  How to enter: 1)	Take before and after pictures of your DIY project. 2)	Post your pictures to the Grand Designs Live Facebook page with a description of the project and including our hashtag #BLACKDECKERDIY. Alternatively, images and the description can be emailed to competitions@granddesignslive.co.za

We're so excited by some of the #BlackDeckerDIY entries we've received this week: A pallet to aquarium stand, installation of new cupboards and rain gutter bookshelves. How to enter: 1) Take before and after pictures of your DIY project. 2) Post your pictures to the Grand Designs Live Facebook page with a description of the project and including our hashtag #BLACKDECKERDIY. Alternatively, images and the description can be emailed to competitions@granddesignslive.co.za

Step 11 - Place a 15mm mdf strip beteween the front and back panels and secure with wood glue. This will form part of the internal structure and provide a sturdy base for the cup hooks to be screwed into later.

Step 11 - Place a 15mm mdf strip beteween the front and back panels and secure with wood glue. This will form part of the internal structure and provide a sturdy base for the cup hooks to be screwed into later.

Step 1 - I drew up templates for all the parts of the bird house and traced them onto 3mm mdf

Step 1 - I drew up templates for all the parts of the bird house and traced them onto 3mm mdf

10. And there it is! For the lid I used covered buttons of the same material which I fastened from the underside through the holes I bored earlier. I decided on a diamond pattern for the buttons. Pull the line tight on the underside so that the button wil sink in into the batting on the top. This create a nice chesterfield look. For the bottom edges I used frills which I glued onto the material to give the ottoman that final classy look. My ottoman is sturdy, practical and it looks great!

10. And there it is! For the lid I used covered buttons of the same material which I fastened from the underside through the holes I bored earlier. I decided on a diamond pattern for the buttons. Pull the line tight on the underside so that the button wil sink in into the batting on the top. This create a nice chesterfield look. For the bottom edges I used frills which I glued onto the material to give the ottoman that final classy look. My ottoman is sturdy, practical and it looks great!

8. The bottom where the feet are can be a bit tricky as well. You need to fold the corners of the material twice over and then maneuver it around the edges to get a clean look.

8. The bottom where the feet are can be a bit tricky as well. You need to fold the corners of the material twice over and then maneuver it around the edges to get a clean look.

6. Then you start with the covering up of the box with your chosen material. I first measured my big piece of material into a couple of panels (one for the lid, and two for the box). Then I asked someone to give all the panels a seam. Using the hammer and staples again, I nailed the material fast onto the bottom of the lid. Make sure to place the nails on the double sided seams, otherwise the material will tear loose. The holes you can see here are for the buttons, later on.

6. Then you start with the covering up of the box with your chosen material. I first measured my big piece of material into a couple of panels (one for the lid, and two for the box). Then I asked someone to give all the panels a seam. Using the hammer and staples again, I nailed the material fast onto the bottom of the lid. Make sure to place the nails on the double sided seams, otherwise the material will tear loose. The holes you can see here are for the buttons, later on.

5. The lid gets a thick (10 cm) foam top which you glue fast onto the chip board. Then you cover the lid also with the batting and nail it fast to the underside.

5. The lid gets a thick (10 cm) foam top which you glue fast onto the chip board. Then you cover the lid also with the batting and nail it fast to the underside.

3. And voila! There's the box completed. I screwed the legs from the inside to the bottom of the box, and gave the lid some hinges.

3. And voila! There's the box completed. I screwed the legs from the inside to the bottom of the box, and gave the lid some hinges.

1. First step was to cut out the panels, using my circular saw. I used chip board for the box.

1. First step was to cut out the panels, using my circular saw. I used chip board for the box.

How'd you like to win an awesome R12,000 BLACK+DECKER hamper? Enter our annual DIY competition...  How to enter: 1) Use power tools to enhance your home, upcycle an object, or create something unique that reflects the Responsible Living theme. Take pics along the way! 2) Post your pictures to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/GrandDesignsSA), using the hashtag ‪#‎BlackDeckerDIY‬  3) Email your pictures to diygurusearch@media-ten.co.za

How'd you like to win an awesome R12,000 BLACK+DECKER hamper? Enter our annual DIY competition... How to enter: 1) Use power tools to enhance your home, upcycle an object, or create something unique that reflects the Responsible Living theme. Take pics along the way! 2) Post your pictures to our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/GrandDesignsSA), using the hashtag ‪#‎BlackDeckerDIY‬ 3) Email your pictures to diygurusearch@media-ten.co.za


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3. And voila! There's the box completed. I screwed the legs from the inside to the bottom of the box, and gave the lid some hinges.

3. And voila! There's the box completed. I screwed the legs from the inside to the bottom of the box, and gave the lid some hinges.

1. First step was to cut out the panels, using my circular saw. I used chip board for the box.

1. First step was to cut out the panels, using my circular saw. I used chip board for the box.

10. And there it is! For the lid I used covered buttons of the same material which I fastened from the underside through the holes I bored earlier. I decided on a diamond pattern for the buttons. Pull the line tight on the underside so that the button wil sink in into the batting on the top. This create a nice chesterfield look. For the bottom edges I used frills which I glued onto the material to give the ottoman that final classy look. My ottoman is sturdy, practical and it looks great!

10. And there it is! For the lid I used covered buttons of the same material which I fastened from the underside through the holes I bored earlier. I decided on a diamond pattern for the buttons. Pull the line tight on the underside so that the button wil sink in into the batting on the top. This create a nice chesterfield look. For the bottom edges I used frills which I glued onto the material to give the ottoman that final classy look. My ottoman is sturdy, practical and it looks great!

6. Then you start with the covering up of the box with your chosen material. I first measured my big piece of material into a couple of panels (one for the lid, and two for the box). Then I asked someone to give all the panels a seam. Using the hammer and staples again, I nailed the material fast onto the bottom of the lid. Make sure to place the nails on the double sided seams, otherwise the material will tear loose. The holes you can see here are for the buttons, later on.

6. Then you start with the covering up of the box with your chosen material. I first measured my big piece of material into a couple of panels (one for the lid, and two for the box). Then I asked someone to give all the panels a seam. Using the hammer and staples again, I nailed the material fast onto the bottom of the lid. Make sure to place the nails on the double sided seams, otherwise the material will tear loose. The holes you can see here are for the buttons, later on.

8. The bottom where the feet are can be a bit tricky as well. You need to fold the corners of the material twice over and then maneuver it around the edges to get a clean look.

8. The bottom where the feet are can be a bit tricky as well. You need to fold the corners of the material twice over and then maneuver it around the edges to get a clean look.

5. The lid gets a thick (10 cm) foam top which you glue fast onto the chip board. Then you cover the lid also with the batting and nail it fast to the underside.

5. The lid gets a thick (10 cm) foam top which you glue fast onto the chip board. Then you cover the lid also with the batting and nail it fast to the underside.

Step 3 - I cut out all the remaining elements using a scroll saw

Step 3 - I cut out all the remaining elements using a scroll saw

Step 5 - Draw a 3mm frame around the base and using wood glue fix a 15mm mdf square in each corner. This will create the internal structure to which the walls will be attached.

Step 5 - Draw a 3mm frame around the base and using wood glue fix a 15mm mdf square in each corner. This will create the internal structure to which the walls will be attached.

Step 1 - I drew up templates for all the parts of the bird house and traced them onto 3mm mdf

Step 1 - I drew up templates for all the parts of the bird house and traced them onto 3mm mdf

9. This is how the finished belly of the box looks now. Nice and clean around the feet and the material pulled tight over the batting.

9. This is how the finished belly of the box looks now. Nice and clean around the feet and the material pulled tight over the batting.

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