Georgina Pope (1862–1938) was a Canadian nurse who served with distinction in the Second Boer War (South Africa) & First World War (England & France). She became the first Canadian to receive the Royal Red Cross, awarded to her for conspicuous service in the field. In 1908 she was appointed first Matron of the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Upon her death, Pope was granted a full military funeral.

First head nurse of Canadian Contingent to Boer War Georgina Pope wears possibly her nurse uniform from Bellevue Hospital, New York, on

Gandhi - in South Africa during the Boer War - He worked as a medic.

"The Natal Indian Ambulance Corps was created by Mahatma Gandhi for use by the British as stretcher-bearers during the Second Boer War, with expenses met by the local Indian community. Gandhi and the corps served at the Battle of Spion Kop.

"Canada sent 40 teachers to teach Boer children in the concentration camps, which Emily Hobhouse had started"

"Canada sent 40 teachers to teach Boer children (in the concentration camps), an initiative started by Emily Hobhouse"

South African Military History Society - Lectures - Four Exceptional Women in the Anglo-Boer War

Emily Hobhouse / South African Military History Society - Lectures - Four Exceptional Women in the Anglo-Boer War

this Day in History: Oct 10, 1825: Paul Kruger, the face of Boer resistance against the British during the Second Boer War is born

this Day in History: Oct Paul Kruger, the face of Boer resistance against the British during the Second Boer War is born

Johanna Brandt (18 November 1876 in Heidelberg / Transvaal – 13 January 1964 in Nuweland) was a South African propagandist of Afrikaner nationalism, spy during the Boer War, prophet and writer on controversial health subjects.

Johanna Brandt November 1876 in Heidelberg / Transvaal – 13 January 1964 in Nuweland) was a South African propagandist of Afrikaner nationalism, spy during the Boer War, prophet and writer on controversial health subjects.

The Guerrilla War General JH (Koos) de la Rey by Philip Terblanche - War Museum of the Boer Republics The Boers launched their extensive guerrilla campaign against the occupying British forces after a decisive military council meeting held at Kroonstad on 17 March 1900. Here they decided that one of their main objectives would be to try and destroy the British lines of communication. Railway depots and bridges were continually destructed and assaulted

The Guerrilla War General JH (Koos) de la Rey by Philip Terblanche - War Museum of the Boer Republics The Boers launched their extensive guerrilla campaign against the occupying British forces after a decisive military council meeting held at Kroonstad on 17 March 1900. Here they decided that one of their main objectives would be to try and destroy the British lines of communication. Railway depots and bridges were continually destructed and assaulted

The Guerrilla War General JH (Koos) de la Rey by Philip Terblanche - War Museum of the Boer Republics The Boers launched their extensive guerrilla campaign against the occupying British forces after a decisive military council meeting held at Kroonstad on 17 March 1900. Here they decided that one of their main objectives would be to try and destroy the British lines of communication. Railway depots and bridges were continually destructed and assaulted

The Guerrilla War General JH (Koos) de la Rey by Philip Terblanche - War Museum of the Boer Republics The Boers launched their extensive guerrilla campaign against the occupying British forces after a decisive military council meeting held at Kroonstad on 17 March 1900. Here they decided that one of their main objectives would be to try and destroy the British lines of communication. Railway depots and bridges were continually destructed and assaulted

President Kruger and his Family in 'Oranjelust', Utrecht, Netherlands | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

President Kruger and his Family in 'Oranjelust', Utrecht, Netherlands | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Boer prisoners held by the British army at Kakul, India (now in Pakistan) during the Second Boer War, 1902. Thousands of Boer prisoners were sent overseas by the British authorities, in an effort to free up the resources needed to supply their own troops in South Africa, and to isolate the prisoners from local sympathisers. (Photo by Sean Sexton/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Boer prisoners held by the British army at Kakul, India (now in Pakistan) during the Second Boer War, 1902. Thousands of Boer prisoners were sent overseas by the British authorities, in an effort to free up the resources needed to supply their own troops in South Africa, and to isolate the prisoners from local sympathisers. (Photo by Sean Sexton/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

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