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Boer General Koos De La Rey (22/10/1847 - 15/09/1914), one of South Africa's best loved military leaders during the Anglo Boer-War. Famous for his humane treatment of his enemies

Boer General Koos De La Rey - one of South Africa's best loved military leaders during the Anglo Boer-War. Famous for his humane treatment of his enemies

Boer civilians watch as their house burns from scorched earth tactics by the British Army during the Second Anglo-Boer War, South Africa, 1899-1902.

Second Boer War - One British response to the guerrilla war was a 'scorched earth' policy to deny the guerrillas supplies and refuge. In this image Boer civilians watch their house as it is burned.

Boer civilians watch as their house burns from scorched earth tactics by the British Army during the Second Anglo-Boer War, South Africa, 1899-1902.

Second Boer War - One British response to the guerrilla war was a 'scorched earth' policy to deny the guerrillas supplies and refuge. In this image Boer civilians watch their house as it is burned.

Farms burning courtesy of the British scorched earth policy. Destroying the Boer's homes, starving their women and children in concentration camps in an attempt to break their resolve

Farms burning courtesy of the British scorched earth policy. Destroying the Boer's homes, starving their women and children in concentration camps in an attempt to break their resolve

Farms burning courtesy of the British scorched earth policy. Destroying the Boer's homes, starving their women and children in concentration camps in an attempt to break their resolve

Farms burning courtesy of the British scorched earth policy. Destroying the Boer's homes, starving their women and children in concentration camps in an attempt to break their resolve

The Battle of Blood River - The Boer picked off the Zulu warriors lining the banks of the river that ran red with their blood - hence the name Blood River.  An estimated 3000 Zulu warriors were killed on the veld, in the donga and in the river. Not a single Boer was killed. The Zulus were no match against a strong Boer defensive position. In the ultimate of ironies, on that very day, the British had run up the Union Jack in Durban. The Voortrekkers' greatest enemy had arrived.

The Battle of Blood River - The Boer picked off the Zulu warriors lining the banks of the river that ran red with their blood - hence the name Blood River. An estimated 3000 Zulu warriors were killed on the veld, in the donga and in the river. Not a single Boer was killed. The Zulus were no match against a strong Boer defensive position. In the ultimate of ironies, on that very day, the British had run up the Union Jack in Durban. The Voortrekkers' greatest enemy had arrived.

The Battle of Blood River - The Boer picked off the Zulu warriors lining the banks of the river that ran red with their blood - hence the name Blood River.  An estimated 3000 Zulu warriors were killed on the veld, in the donga and in the river. Not a single Boer was killed. The Zulus were no match against a strong Boer defensive position. In the ultimate of ironies, on that very day, the British had run up the Union Jack in Durban. The Voortrekkers' greatest enemy had arrived.

The Battle of Blood River - The Boer picked off the Zulu warriors lining the banks of the river that ran red with their blood - hence the name Blood River. An estimated 3000 Zulu warriors were killed on the veld, in the donga and in the river. Not a single Boer was killed. The Zulus were no match against a strong Boer defensive position. In the ultimate of ironies, on that very day, the British had run up the Union Jack in Durban. The Voortrekkers' greatest enemy had arrived.

British Poster: The British Colonial Empire - Ceylon Garrison Artillery - Our Allies the Colonies

Allies or Rapists? British Poster: The British Colonial Empire - Ceylon Garrison Artillery - Our Allies the Colonies

In 1791, Thomas Peters, an African American who had served in the Black Pioneers, went to England to report the grievances of the black population in Nova Scotia. American slaves who joined British forces, known as Black Loyalists, had been given their freedom and resettled there by the Crown after the American Revolution. Land grants and assistance in starting the settlements had been intermittent and slow. During his visit, Peters met with the directors of the Sierra Leone Company and…

Olaudah Equiano (c. 1745 – 31 March known in his lifetime as Gustavus Vassa was a prominent African in London, a freed slave who supported the British movement to end the slave trade


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