Orisa Lifestyle is a religious system based on the veneration of a supreme god through various deities (Orishas), and ancestral spirits. African-Americans who practice the Yoruba religious tradition have stated that Orisa Lifestyle provides a means for cultural identity and provides an opportunity to revisit and reclaim traditions that were denied to our ancestors during enslavement. For men and women of African descent, who are interested in Orisa Lifestyle, this course is perfect…

Orisa Lifestyle is a religious system based on the veneration of a supreme god through various deities (Orishas), and ancestral spirits. African-Americans who practice the Yoruba religious tradition have stated that Orisa Lifestyle provides a means for cultural identity and provides an opportunity to revisit and reclaim traditions that were denied to our ancestors during enslavement. For men and women of African descent, who are interested in Orisa Lifestyle, this course is perfect…

Mawu (“MAH-woo”). The goddess of Earth-and-sky, exalted in West African Vodun religion. She is goddess of the moon and and represents the wisdom of age. Mawu can help you age with grace and become an empowered elder. Together, with Lisa her twin flame, they form an androgynous two-in-one deity.

Mawu (“MAH-woo”). The goddess of Earth-and-sky, exalted in West African Vodun religion. She is goddess of the moon and and represents the wisdom of age. Mawu can help you age with grace and become an empowered elder. Together, with Lisa her twin flame, they form an androgynous two-in-one deity.

The Yoruba people: Their Religion, Manners, Customs, Laws, Language - The Yoruba people (Yoruba: Àwọn ọmọ Yorùbá) are an ethnic group of southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa.#africanbookstore

The Yoruba people: Their Religion, Manners, Customs, Laws, Language - The Yoruba people (Yoruba: Àwọn ọmọ Yorùbá) are an ethnic group of southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin in West Africa.#africanbookstore

Real life artistic depictions of some Yoruba Orisha. Photo-manipulation by James C. Lewis.

Real life artistic depictions of some Yoruba Orisha. Photo-manipulation by James C. Lewis.

Ogum - In Yoruba religion, Ògún is one of the primoridal Orishas, the first one to come to the realm of Ilê Aiyê (earth) to see if it's suitable for human life. He's the husband of Oyà, and he's a blacksmith and a warrior, master of metalurgic techniques, hunting, agriculture, and war. Ògún is believed to be the very first orisha cultuated by Yoruba people in West Africa.

Ogum - In Yoruba religion, Ògún is one of the primoridal Orishas, the first one to come to the realm of Ilê Aiyê (earth) to see if it's suitable for human life. He's the husband of Oyà, and he's a blacksmith and a warrior, master of metalurgic techniques, hunting, agriculture, and war. Ògún is believed to be the very first orisha cultuated by Yoruba people in West Africa.

Yemanja is an orisha, originally of the Yoruba religion, who has become prominent in many Afro-American religions. Yoruba people, from what is now called Yorubaland, brought Yemaya/Yemoja and a host of other deities/energy forces in nature with them when they were brought to the shores of the Americas as captives. She is the ocean, the essence of motherhood, and a fierce protector of children.

Yemanja is an orisha, originally of the Yoruba religion, who has become prominent in many Afro-American religions. Yoruba people, from what is now called Yorubaland, brought Yemaya/Yemoja and a host of other deities/energy forces in nature with them when they were brought to the shores of the Americas as captives. She is the ocean, the essence of motherhood, and a fierce protector of children.

Olokun is an Orisha in Yoruba religion, associated with the sea.[1] It works closely with Oya (Deity of the Winds) and Egungun (Collective Ancestral Spirits) to herald the way for those that pass to ancestorship, as it plays a critical role in Iku, Aye and the transition of human beings and spirits between these two existences.

Olokun is an Orisha in Yoruba religion, associated with the sea.[1] It works closely with Oya (Deity of the Winds) and Egungun (Collective Ancestral Spirits) to herald the way for those that pass to ancestorship, as it plays a critical role in Iku, Aye and the transition of human beings and spirits between these two existences.

Pinterest
Search