Yayoi period

Origin of Mirrors: Bronze mirror excavated from Tsubaiotsukayama, Yamashiro Burial Mound

Jomon-era hair accessory. BC.1,200 - BC.800. Iwate Japan.

Jomon-era hair accessory. BC.1,200 - BC.800. Iwate Japan.

Japanese History - The Kofun period (古墳時代 Kofun jidai?) is an era in the history of Japan from around 250 to 538. It follows the Yayoi period. The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from this era.

Haniwa (terra cotta ritual burial item) horse statue from the Kofun period (古墳時代) 300 to The word kofun is Japanese for the type of burial mounds dating from this era.

Okayama|岡山(おかやま)|津島遺跡|縄文時代晩期から弥生・古墳時代にかけての大規模な集落の遺跡。竪穴住居跡をはじめ多量の石器・土器が出土し,弥生時代中期の半乾田が確認された,貴重な遺跡である。

Okayama|岡山(おかやま)|津島遺跡|縄文時代晩期から弥生・古墳時代にかけての大規模な集落の遺跡。竪穴住居跡をはじめ多量の石器・土器が出土し,弥生時代中期の半乾田が確認された,貴重な遺跡である。

The design of the manhole cover is of Dotaku, bronze bells from the late Yayoi Period (2nd and 3rd centuries) and reflect the large number of archeological sites associated with this ancient part of Japan.    Not much is known for sure about dotaku, though they were probably ritual objects used in early agricultural rites, and that they were introduced, like so much in early Japan, from Korea.

Dotaku - Japanese bronze bells from the late Yayoi Period, Hikawa archeological site. Introduced from Korea. Their design is also found on more modern manhole covers.

The coffin which put two earthenware vessels together, and was made. Yayoi period (BC.300 - AD.250). Nara Japan.

A coffin made of two vessels put together, Yayoi period - Nara Japan.

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