Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but  no other day produced  such appalling losses

Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but no other day produced such appalling losses

WWI. ‘Sammy’, the mascot of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was gassed during the Second Battle of Ypres which began on 22 April 1915.

WWI. ‘Sammy’, the mascot of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was gassed during the Second Battle of Ypres which began on 22 April 1915.

World War 1 British enlistment poster #UpscaleYourWalls with ruemarcellin.com Orginal #Vintage #Posters and #Prints

World War 1 British enlistment poster #UpscaleYourWalls with ruemarcellin.com Orginal #Vintage #Posters and #Prints

British WW1 soldiers with Trench Coat: developed as an alternative to the heavy serge greatcoats worn by British and French soldiers in the First World War

British WW1 soldiers with Trench Coat: developed as an alternative to the heavy serge greatcoats worn by British and French soldiers in the First World War

Firearm of the Week, The Lee-Enfield Rifle No. 1 Mk III / III* SMLE (Smelly)

Firearm of the Week, The Lee-Enfield Rifle No. 1 Mk III / III* SMLE (Smelly)

A soldier of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) arriving home on leave during the First World War.

A soldier of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment) arriving home on leave during the First World War.

An official photo describing the kit of a British infantryman in 1939. Note that the gas mask ('respirator') and anti-chemical warfare cape are parts of the outfit, remnants of WW1 memories. In actual combat, and marching with full kit, the British infantryman would carry a pack known as a "valise" that contained more clothing and personal items. Officers wore the exact same uniform save for markings of their rank.

An official photo describing the kit of a British infantryman in 1939. Note that the gas mask ('respirator') and anti-chemical warfare cape are parts of the outfit, remnants of WW1 memories. In actual combat, and marching with full kit, the British infantryman would carry a pack known as a "valise" that contained more clothing and personal items. Officers wore the exact same uniform save for markings of their rank.

Soldier and Horse wearing a gas mask during the Battle of Verdun, 1916 (b/w photo) by French Photographer / Private Collection

Soldier and Horse wearing a gas mask during the Battle of Verdun, 1916 (b/w photo) by French Photographer / Private Collection

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