Tiger Counts Increases in India with efforts of Wildlife Conservation Society

Tiger Counts Increases in India with efforts of Wildlife Conservation Society

Wildlife SOS is the largest wildlife rescue, rehabilitation, and conservation group in India. Place a bid and contribute to saving India's precious wildlife! Our goal is to raise $60,000 in 10 days. Stretch your dollar even further by referring your friends through the social media link attached to every item. A huge thank you to our donor community and to our volunteers for making this possible. Any funds received from the auction may be utilized to support any of the programs of Wildli...

Wildlife SOS is the largest wildlife rescue, rehabilitation, and conservation group in India. Place a bid and contribute to saving India's precious wildlife! Our goal is to raise $60,000 in 10 days. Stretch your dollar even further by referring your friends through the social media link attached to every item. A huge thank you to our donor community and to our volunteers for making this possible. Any funds received from the auction may be utilized to support any of the programs of Wildli...

Tiger Counts Increases in India with efforts of Wildlife Conservation Society

Tiger Counts Increases in India with efforts of Wildlife Conservation Society

Tiger poaching. Tiger bones of Bengal tigers shot by poachers confiscated in India.

Tiger poaching. Tiger bones of Bengal tigers shot by poachers confiscated in India.

The gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) is a crocodilian of the family Gavialidae that is native to the Indian subcontinent and also called gavial and fish-eating crocodile. As the species has undergone both chronic long term and a rapid short-term declines it is listed as a Critically Endangered by IUCN.[1]  The gharial is one of three crocodilians native to India, apart from the mugger crocodile and the saltwater crocodile.[2] It is one of the longest of all living crocodilians.[3]  In Hindi…

The gharial (Gavialis gangeticus) is a crocodilian of the family Gavialidae that is native to the Indian subcontinent and also called gavial and fish-eating crocodile. As the species has undergone both chronic long term and a rapid short-term declines it is listed as a Critically Endangered by IUCN.[1] The gharial is one of three crocodilians native to India, apart from the mugger crocodile and the saltwater crocodile.[2] It is one of the longest of all living crocodilians.[3] In Hindi…

Another rhinoceros subspecies gone forever: The IUCN has confirmed that the Western black rhino (Diceros bicornis longipes) is indeed extinct. Now, a permit to hunt a black rhino in Namibia sold for $350,000 at an auction in Dallas with proceeds going to protect the endangered animals (isn't that bizarre?). Protesters from animal rights groups say the sale is immoral conservation (but there isn't any value in morality among Libertarians, is there? It's about SELF.)

Another rhinoceros subspecies gone forever: The IUCN has confirmed that the Western black rhino (Diceros bicornis longipes) is indeed extinct. Now, a permit to hunt a black rhino in Namibia sold for $350,000 at an auction in Dallas with proceeds going to protect the endangered animals (isn't that bizarre?). Protesters from animal rights groups say the sale is immoral conservation (but there isn't any value in morality among Libertarians, is there? It's about SELF.)

Tiger Safari Travel Guide, by Responsible Travel: The majority of tiger safaris take place in India in their national parks and tiger reserves, all now protected since 1971 when the new prime minister, Indira Gandhi went on a mission to stop the devastating demise of tigers by setting up Project Tiger, which still exists today, but is more commonly known as the National Tiger Conservation Authority.  (Pictured: Bandhavgarh tiger and wildlife safari, India)

Tiger Safari Travel Guide, by Responsible Travel: The majority of tiger safaris take place in India in their national parks and tiger reserves, all now protected since 1971 when the new prime minister, Indira Gandhi went on a mission to stop the devastating demise of tigers by setting up Project Tiger, which still exists today, but is more commonly known as the National Tiger Conservation Authority. (Pictured: Bandhavgarh tiger and wildlife safari, India)

Tibetan Antelope - Wildlife Conservation Society - Tibetan antelopes, also known as chiru, once grazed in magnificent herds of up to thousands of individuals in the high mountain steppes and semi-desert areas of the Tibetan Plateau. This windswept region includes China’s provinces of Qinghai and Xinjiang and Tibet Autonomous Region as well as a small part of northern India.

Tibetan Antelope - Wildlife Conservation Society - Tibetan antelopes, also known as chiru, once grazed in magnificent herds of up to thousands of individuals in the high mountain steppes and semi-desert areas of the Tibetan Plateau. This windswept region includes China’s provinces of Qinghai and Xinjiang and Tibet Autonomous Region as well as a small part of northern India.

Broken Tail: A Tiger's Last Journey - PBS Nature full episode about the journey of a tiger called Broken Tail. Absolutely wonderful documentary!  Won the top honor at the 2011 Jackon Hole Wildlife Film Festival, known as the Oscars of nature films! Broken Tail won Best of Festival, Best Script, and Best Human/Wildlife Interactions at the 2012 International Wildlife Film Festival!

Broken Tail: A Tiger's Last Journey

Broken Tail: A Tiger's Last Journey - PBS Nature full episode about the journey of a tiger called Broken Tail. Absolutely wonderful documentary! Won the top honor at the 2011 Jackon Hole Wildlife Film Festival, known as the Oscars of nature films! Broken Tail won Best of Festival, Best Script, and Best Human/Wildlife Interactions at the 2012 International Wildlife Film Festival!

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