When did ww1 end

When the war ended the women wished that these jobs would stay forever because they liked what they had been doing for over two years. Also they had put their heart and souk into their work and did it way better than men. Also many employers wanted to keep them because they liked how much their sales had gone up with the women working. In the end some women kept their jobs while others went back to do the housework.

Women munition workers sorting shells during the First World War (women

"My interest in WW1 comes from compassion. I wrote Fifty Good Men and True: Memories of ‘the Famous Fifty’ Volunteers Who Fought in the War to End All Wars 1914-18 and Greater Love because I did not want these men that have served our Country with honour and sacrifice to be forgotten. I started writing when I was 12 without ever knowing there was a poet in the family". Michael wrote this poem to honour his grandfather’s sacrifice during WW1.

"My interest in WW1 comes from compassion. I wrote Fifty Good Men and True: Memories of ‘the Famous Fifty’ Volunteers Who Fought in the War to End All Wars 1914-18 and Greater Love because I did not want these men that have served our Country with honour and sacrifice to be forgotten. I started writing when I was 12 without ever knowing there was a poet in the family". Michael wrote this poem to honour his grandfather’s sacrifice during WW1.

People celebrate the end of war on a London bus

How did war end?

London crowds celebrating the signing of the Armistice (Nov. The first Armistice Day)

HMS Britannia (1906), On the morning of 9 November 1918, captained by Francis F…

HMS Britannia (1906), On the morning of 9 November 1918, captained by Francis F…

The end of World War 1 left many nations unhappy. Defeated people's, such as the Germans, felt humiliated. They resented losing territory and making war payments. Even people in winning nations, such as Italy and Japan, felt that they did not get enough land for the sacrifices they had made. When economic troubles came, frustration and fear added to this anger.

The end of World War 1 left many nations unhappy. Defeated people's, such as the Germans, felt humiliated. They resented losing territory and making war payments. Even people in winning nations, such as Italy and Japan, felt that they did not get enough land for the sacrifices they had made. When economic troubles came, frustration and fear added to this anger.

By the time the French Colonial Corp and the British Expeditionary Force arrived on the battlefront they did little good. Although made up of a highly regarded professional elite they were decisively defeated when they placed themselves in front of this onslaught. Nearly every fort the Germans attacked was captured and by the end of October only a small corner of Belgium remained in allied hands. The German advance was not stopped in battle but by the decision to breach the dikes of the Yser…

By the time the French Colonial Corp and the British Expeditionary Force arrived on the battlefront they did little good. Although made up of a highly regarded professional elite they were decisively defeated when they placed themselves in front of this onslaught. Nearly every fort the Germans attacked was captured and by the end of October only a small corner of Belgium remained in allied hands. The German advance was not stopped in battle but by the decision to breach the dikes of the Yser…

Alan F Poulton, from Enfield, north London, wonders how his father ended up fighting the Pathans on the North West Frontier in India — a region many British officers called ‘‘the Grim’’. Like so many, says Alan, his father didn’t like to talk about his experiences, but Alan did find out a few things. Your First World War memories - Telegraph

Your First World War memories

François Christophe Kellermann or de Kellermann, 1st Duc de Valmy (28 May 1735 – 23 September 1820) was a French military commander, later the Général d'Armée, a Marshal of France and a freemason.Marshal Kellermann served in varying roles throughout the entirety of two epochal conflicts, the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.

François Christophe Kellermann or de Kellermann, 1st Duc de Valmy (28 May 1735 – 23 September 1820) was a French military commander, later the Général d'Armée, a Marshal of France and a freemason.Marshal Kellermann served in varying roles throughout the entirety of two epochal conflicts, the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars.

WW1, July 30, 1916 -  “Guillemont, Somme: All that remains of the village at the end of the war.”    Four battalions of the Liverpool Pals attacked Guillemont on July 30, but their attack did not go well from the beginning. A dense fog meant the artillery bombardment was valueless. Most of the German soldiers left their trenches and hid in No Man's Land, unseen. When the attackers went forward, machine gun bullets came streaming through the fog into their ranks.

July 1916 - The Somme: Liverpool Pals Attack Guillemont Pictured - “All that remains of the village at the end of the war.

Shinano - at 65000 tons the largest carrier of WW2, and a conversion of what was laid down as the third of the massive 'Yamato' class battleships. Completed in October 1944, she was sunk en route to Kure for final fitting out the following month by a US submarine; the largest vessel ever sunk by underwater attack.

[Photo] Carrier Shinano in Tokyo Bay, Japan, 11 Nov 1944

naval-weeb: “ Japanese aircraft carrier Shinano underway during her sea trials off Yokohama Japan, November 1944 “ The Shinano was suppose to be the Yamato class battleship along with Yamato.

Emmeline Pankhurst ~ thank you Emmeline!  Following the end of World War I the UK "1918 Representation of the People Act" began the process of allowing women to vote.

Emmeline Pankhurst, leader of the Suffragettes who endured hunger strikes and imprisonment for women's rights to vote.

Antwerp 1914. Belgium had a weak fighting force of 117,000 troops, but the Germans did not subdue the defenses of the city until October, when the last elements of Belgian opposition surrendered. Germany remained in control of Belgium until their surrender in November 1918, managing to hold onto Brussels until the end of the war.

Antwerp 1914. Belgium had a weak fighting force of 117,000 troops, but the Germans did not subdue the defenses of the city until October, when the last elements of Belgian opposition surrendered. Germany remained in control of Belgium until their surrender in November 1918, managing to hold onto Brussels until the end of the war.

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