Wang Mang (ca. 45 B.C.– A.D. 23), a usurper of the Han throne, established the short-lived Xin dynasty in A.D. 9. The present vessel is one of the few surviving examples illustrating his standardization of measurements

Wang Mang (ca. 45 B.C.– A.D. 23), a usurper of the Han throne, established the short-lived Xin dynasty in A.D. 9. The present vessel is one of the few surviving examples illustrating his standardization of measurements

Wang Mang (ca. 45 B.C.– A.D. 23), a usurper of the Han throne, established the short-lived Xin dynasty in A.D. 9. The present vessel is one of the few surviving examples illustrating his standardization of measurements

Wang Mang (ca. 45 B.C.– A.D. 23), a usurper of the Han throne, established the short-lived Xin dynasty in A.D. 9. The present vessel is one of the few surviving examples illustrating his standardization of measurements

Asian continent during the time of the Roman Empire. Han Dynasty  (206 BC-220 AD)was the first big empire in China spreading from Yellow River basin. Dont forget that for romans, Asia was their province in Anatolia (modern Turkey), which is also called Asia Minor today.

Asian continent during the time of the Roman Empire. Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD)was the first big empire in China spreading from Yellow River basin. Dont forget that for romans, Asia was their province in Anatolia (modern Turkey), which is also called Asia Minor today.

"Love yourself" by mang03xo ❤ liked on Polyvore featuring Baxton Studio, Alexander Wang, Stuart Weitzman, The Created Co., Smith & Cult, Victoria's Secret and Marc Jacobs

"Love yourself" by mang03xo ❤ liked on Polyvore featuring Baxton Studio, Alexander Wang, Stuart Weitzman, The Created Co., Smith & Cult, Victoria's Secret and Marc Jacobs

wang mang s-148

wang mang s-148

Chinese Empire, Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (9-23 AD), Spade Money Big Pu (Value 1000), after 10 AD. Wang Mang's spade coins had face values from 200 to 1000 copper coins. This piece bears the inscription "one spade worth 1000" – meaning 1000 round copper coins, the so-called wu shu.

Chinese Empire, Xin Dynasty, Wang Mang (9-23 AD), Spade Money Big Pu (Value 1000), after 10 AD. Wang Mang's spade coins had face values from 200 to 1000 copper coins. This piece bears the inscription "one spade worth 1000" – meaning 1000 round copper coins, the so-called wu shu.

18a.   Obverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD). The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it. 26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175. This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy. Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD 23.

18a. Obverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD). The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it. 26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175. This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy. Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD 23.

18b.  Reverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD).   The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it.  26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175.   This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy.   Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD…

18b. Reverse side of a Bu Quan (布泉 or "Spade coin"), cast from AD 9-14 by Han Dynasty usurper Wang Mang who created the Xin Dynasty (7-23 AD). The coinage was too complex and people did not trust it. 26mm in size; 3+ gram3 in weight. S-175. This coin was known later as the Nan Qian (男錢; "Male Cash"), from the belief that if a woman wore this on her sash, she would give birth to a boy. Eventually, Wang Mang's unsuccessful reforms provoked an uprising, and he was killed by rebels in AD…

Bronze coin of the Wang Mang Dinasty, 13th century.

Bronze coin of the Wang Mang Dinasty, 13th century.

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