Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan on the last night of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March. She is the only white woman honored at the Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial. Remembered primarily for the atmosphere of scandal surrounding her death, she is considered the most controversial of the civil-rights martyrs.

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan on the last night of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March. She is the only white woman honored at the Montgomery Civil Rights Memorial. Remembered primarily for the atmosphere of scandal surrounding her death, she is considered the most controversial of the civil-rights martyrs.

Led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Viola Liuzzo and thousands of other marchers walked to Montgomery, where King spoke on the Capitol steps, telling the crowd that freedom was imminent:  That night, Liuzzo, tired but exhilarated, shuttled local marchers back to their homes. A car filled with Ku Klux Klan members tried to force her off the road. Finally, they pulled alongside Liuzzo's car and shot her in her head. The 39-year-old died instantly.

Led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Viola Liuzzo and thousands of other marchers walked to Montgomery, where King spoke on the Capitol steps, telling the crowd that freedom was imminent: That night, Liuzzo, tired but exhilarated, shuttled local marchers back to their homes. A car filled with Ku Klux Klan members tried to force her off the road. Finally, they pulled alongside Liuzzo's car and shot her in her head. The 39-year-old died instantly.

Viola Liuzzo was murdered in this car on an isolated Alabama highway while she participated in a voting rights campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Viola Liuzzo was murdered in this car on an isolated Alabama highway while she participated in a voting rights campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965)  She Died Fighting For Civil Rights  Viola Fauver Liuzzo belonged to the NAACP at the height of the civil rights movement. In 1965, she marched with Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to protest discrimination. Afterwards, Liuzzo and her black co-worker, Leroy Merton, drove marchers to the airport. On one trip, they were spotted by four Ku Klux Klansmen who guessed that a white woman and a black man traveling together were civil rights activists.

Viola Liuzzo (1925-1965) She Died Fighting For Civil Rights Viola Fauver Liuzzo belonged to the NAACP at the height of the civil rights movement. In 1965, she marched with Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to protest discrimination. Afterwards, Liuzzo and her black co-worker, Leroy Merton, drove marchers to the airport. On one trip, they were spotted by four Ku Klux Klansmen who guessed that a white woman and a black man traveling together were civil rights activists.

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight' Viola Liuzzo, was killed by Ku Klux Klan members following a voting rights march in Alabama in 1965. Liuzzo was the only white woman protester to die in the civil rights movement.

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight' Viola Liuzzo, was killed by Ku Klux Klan members following a voting rights march in Alabama in 1965. Liuzzo was the only white woman protester to die in the civil rights movement.

Viola Liuzzo carries her shoes while walking with other civil rights activist before she was shot and killed in Alabama.

Viola Liuzzo carries her shoes while walking with other civil rights activist before she was shot and killed in Alabama.

Viola Liuzzo - Wikipedia

Viola Liuzzo - Wikipedia

The only white woman killed in the civil rights movement, Viola Liuzzo left comfort of Detroit home to help blacks overcome voting barriers.

The only white woman killed in the civil rights movement, Viola Liuzzo left comfort of Detroit home to help blacks overcome voting barriers.

Viola Liuzzo, mother of five from Detroit, was shot and killed while driving a young black activist, Leroy Moton, back to the town of Selma, Alabama following a protest march to the state capital of Montgomery on March 25, 1965. She was driving the white car near the bottom of the photo when a car pulled alongside hers and shot her twice in the head. Mr. Moton was unhurt. An all-white jury convicted 3 KK Klansmen of the murder Dec 3, 1965.

Viola Liuzzo, mother of five from Detroit, was shot and killed while driving a young black activist, Leroy Moton, back to the town of Selma, Alabama following a protest march to the state capital of Montgomery on March 25, 1965. She was driving the white car near the bottom of the photo when a car pulled alongside hers and shot her twice in the head. Mr. Moton was unhurt. An all-white jury convicted 3 KK Klansmen of the murder Dec 3, 1965.

As we continue our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the historic Selma to Montgomery marches, we look at the civil rights martyrs who lost their lives in the fight to secure voting rights in Alabama. Between February and August of 1965, four civil rights activists were killed in Alabama: Jimmie Lee Jackson, Viola Liuzzo, Rev. James Reeb and Jonathan Daniels. As tens of thousands of people marked the 50th anniversary in Selma, Democracy Now! spoke to marchers who were honoring these civil…

As we continue our coverage of the 50th anniversary of the historic Selma to Montgomery marches, we look at the civil rights martyrs who lost their lives in the fight to secure voting rights in Alabama. Between February and August of 1965, four civil rights activists were killed in Alabama: Jimmie Lee Jackson, Viola Liuzzo, Rev. James Reeb and Jonathan Daniels. As tens of thousands of people marked the 50th anniversary in Selma, Democracy Now! spoke to marchers who were honoring these civil…

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