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A Fugly Truth Made Pretty: A Cartoonist's Depiction Of Wealth Inequality

A Fugly Truth Made Pretty: A Cartoonist's Depiction Of Wealth Inequality. I'd be remiss to ignore that the illustration contains a small mistake: That gigantisized money stack on the far left is actually five bundles shorter than it should be. (Sigh...)

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US wealth inequality - top 0.1% worth as much as the bottom 90%

Average wealth of families in the bottom 90% and the top 1% of the wealth distribution, in constant 2010 US dollars, 1946-2012

The latest comprehensive look at wealth distribution data reveals that the “ultra-rich” economic top 0.01% of US households now has an all-time high 11.1% of overall wealth. The next tier, the 0.1% – 0.99% has 10.4%, and the top 1% – 0.9% has 18.3%. In total, the top 1% now has an all-time high 39.8% of wealth.

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The Mathematics of Economic Justice: Wealth Distribution in U.S

This activity will make your students freak out. It is about how the wealth of the United States is distributed between the quintiles (wealthiest 20%, next wealthiest 20%, middle 20%, lower middle 20% and poorest 20%.) Students will start by distributing 100 beans, each representing 1% of the $5.2 trillion in wealth of the United States, among each group. They will then come up with their own plan to more fairly distribute the wealth.

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US wealth inequality - top 0.1% worth as much as the bottom 90%

Average wealth of families in the bottom 90% and the top 1% of the wealth distribution, in constant 2010 US dollars, 1946-2012. This is so wrong!

If capitalism were simply a way to meet material needs, it would make no sense that people work harder now that less labor is required for production. But capitalism isn’t just a way to meet material needs; it’s a social system based in alienated relationships. As long as the economy distributes access to resources according to wealth, advances in manufacturing technology will simply force workers to seek other livelihoods. The machine no longer needs us, but it still needs us to keep…