Umberto boccioni

Futurism - Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. 1913. Umberto Boccioni. -influenced by Muybridge's photographs

Futurism - Unique Forms of Continuity in Space. 1913. Umberto Boccioni. -influenced by Muybridge's photographs

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Umberto Boccioni:  "Simultaneous Visions". Umberto Boccioni was an influential Italian painter and sculptor. He helped shape the revolutionary aesthetic of the Futurism movement as one of its principal figures.

Umberto Boccioni: "Simultaneous Visions". Umberto Boccioni was an influential Italian painter and sculptor. He helped shape the revolutionary aesthetic of the Futurism movement as one of its principal figures.

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Dynamism of a soccer/football player, 1913, by Boccioni.  A modern art movement originating among Italian artists in 1909, when Filippo Marinetti's first manifesto of futurism appeared, until the end of World War I.  Futurist painting and sculpture were especially concerned with expressing movement and the dynamics of natural and man-made forms.

Dynamism of a soccer/football player, 1913, by Boccioni. A modern art movement originating among Italian artists in 1909, when Filippo Marinetti's first manifesto of futurism appeared, until the end of World War I. Futurist painting and sculpture were especially concerned with expressing movement and the dynamics of natural and man-made forms.

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"In the brief life span of the Italian Futurist movement, the short-lived Umberto Boccioni was a blazing comet. ... Boccioni was a fiery theoretician of the movement, drafting two Futurist manifestoes in 1910 and 1912 that exalted the force and energy of contemporary life. They called for an art that glorified speed, violence and the machine age, one that above all reflected the dynamism of an engine-driven civilization."[7] --Grace Glueck, New York Times Art Critic

"In the brief life span of the Italian Futurist movement, the short-lived Umberto Boccioni was a blazing comet. ... Boccioni was a fiery theoretician of the movement, drafting two Futurist manifestoes in 1910 and 1912 that exalted the force and energy of contemporary life. They called for an art that glorified speed, violence and the machine age, one that above all reflected the dynamism of an engine-driven civilization."[7] --Grace Glueck, New York Times Art Critic

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Abstract Futurism Animal Bronze Sculpture "Owl", signed Umberto Boccioni | eBay
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