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Gorgeous, unique house by John Pardey Architects. Sit's on the banks of a river that tests the homes stilted design when overflowing

Gorgeous, unique house by John Pardey Architects. Sit's on the banks of a river that tests the homes stilted design when overflowing

Modern kitchen | White kitchens are able to transform a home. If you want a cozy vintage or scandinavian kitchen, you need to use white in your modern kitchen ideas. See more home design ideas at http://www.homedesignideas.eu/10-amazing-design-ideas-for-your-modern-home-white-kitchens/

10 amazing design ideas for your modern home: white kitchens

Modern kitchen | White kitchens are able to transform a home. If you want a cozy vintage or scandinavian kitchen, you need to use white in your modern kitchen ideas. See more home design ideas at http://www.homedesignideas.eu/10-amazing-design-ideas-for-your-modern-home-white-kitchens/

Example of stacked upper floor..https://www.aminkhoury.com Beautiful modern home, mid-century modern, modern house, modern architecture, inspiring house, modern design, cool house, dream house

Example of stacked upper floor..https://www.aminkhoury.com Beautiful modern home, mid-century modern, modern house, modern architecture, inspiring house, modern design, cool house, dream house

The world's first Active House stands at the crest of an estate. Its south-facing roof is covered in solar panels and solar cells, which between them harness more than enough power to keep the occupants warm and the appliances running. In around 30 years' time, if designers have got their sums right, the excess electricity flowing from the house into Denmark's grid will have cancelled out the energy costs of building it, leaving a non-existent footprint on the earth's resources.

Zero-carbon eco home is light years ahead

The world's first Active House stands at the crest of an estate. Its south-facing roof is covered in solar panels and solar cells, which between them harness more than enough power to keep the occupants warm and the appliances running. In around 30 years' time, if designers have got their sums right, the excess electricity flowing from the house into Denmark's grid will have cancelled out the energy costs of building it, leaving a non-existent footprint on the earth's resources.

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