Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Oxford shoes became popular in the 1940's as well & were worn by both men for formal or everyday use & by women for everyday/sporty use. The shoes were made out of leather & could come in one color or two toned, round toe or square toe, & some were decorated with stamped leather caps. The oxford shoes now come in a variety of colors & styles for both genders but simply never seem to go out of style. 1/24/16

17
3

Business shoes and dress shoes: Straight tip Oxford, Whole-cut, Plain toe Oxford, Wing tip Oxford, U-tip, Plain toe Derby, Monk strap, Chukk...

25
4
from V and A Collections

Pair of shoes

Pair of shoes, England, Britain (made) ca. 1700, Materials: Leather with vellum rand; modern ribbon added for latchet fastening. These elegant women's shoes are made of plain leather. This is rather unusual, as shoemakers more commonly used plain leather for working women's shoes. The red leather heel contrasts with the dark upper. From 1675-1700 shoemakers used pointed toes for women's shoes only. This was the first major difference between fashionable footwear for men and women.

25
1
1
from V and A Collections

Pair of shoes

"Shoes in the 17th and 18th centuries were highly decorative. The narrow square toe and shaped heel is typical of the 1670s. The tongue and latchets (straps) have small holes, through which to draw a ribbon to fasten the shoe. While buckle fastenings were coming into fashion for men's shoes at this time, most women continued to tie their shoes with ribbons." Via Peachy.

12
2
from Mail Online

Royal Wedding guests to sample best of British food in 19 splendid rooms

Buckingham Palace Interior, London, England. My nephew and I visited in 2010. The staterooms are only open to visit in July & August when the Queen is residing at Balmoral in Scotland.

12
2
1