Dame Barbara Hepworth  Pelagos 1946.  I love Barbara Hepworth's work.  It has a modern timeless quality and easily  stands the test of time.  After visiting her house in St Ives, her garden gives an insight into the structural form that she so loved and perhaps drew inspiration from.  I think she would have loved how the bamboo in her garden has matured.

Dame Barbara Hepworth Pelagos 1946. I love Barbara Hepworth's work. It has a modern timeless quality and easily stands the test of time. After visiting her house in St Ives, her garden gives an insight into the structural form that she so loved and perhaps drew inspiration from. I think she would have loved how the bamboo in her garden has matured.

Azalea Garden: May 1956 -- Patrick Heron was an English painter, writer and designer, based in St. Ives, Cornwall

Azalea Garden: May 1956 -- Patrick Heron was an English painter, writer and designer, based in St. Ives, Cornwall

wilhelmina barns-graham(1912‑2004), island sheds, st. ives no. 1, 1940. oil on plywood, 33 x 40.5 cm. tate gallery, london, uk http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/barns-graham-island-sheds-st-ives-no-1-t07546

wilhelmina barns-graham(1912‑2004), island sheds, st. ives no. 1, 1940. oil on plywood, 33 x 40.5 cm. tate gallery, london, uk http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/barns-graham-island-sheds-st-ives-no-1-t07546

Google Image Result for http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Arts/Arts_/Pictures/2009/1/23/1232722688452/Ben-Nicholson-Mousehole-001.jpg

Ben Nicholson’s Cornwall

Google Image Result for http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Arts/Arts_/Pictures/2009/1/23/1232722688452/Ben-Nicholson-Mousehole-001.jpg

Starting as an empty white room, Roman Ondak’s Measuring the Universe at Tate St Ives has grown through the contribution of around 90’000 participants to a constellation of black marks. Through the simple action of measuring oneself, Ondak’s work doesn’t just expand on ideas of space and the universal but also the personal, creating a growing living artwork that questions just what a museum is for.

Starting as an empty white room, Roman Ondak’s Measuring the Universe at Tate St Ives has grown through the contribution of around 90’000 participants to a constellation of black marks. Through the simple action of measuring oneself, Ondak’s work doesn’t just expand on ideas of space and the universal but also the personal, creating a growing living artwork that questions just what a museum is for.

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