The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, often pronounced /ˈsnɪk/ snick) was one of the most important organizations of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s.[1][2] It emerged from a student meeting organized by Ella Baker held at Shaw University in April 1960. SNCC grew into a large organization with many supporters in the North who helped raise funds to support SNCC's work in the South, allowing full-time SNCC workers to have a $10 per week salary.

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, often pronounced /ˈsnɪk/ snick) was one of the most important organizations of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s.[1][2] It emerged from a student meeting organized by Ella Baker held at Shaw University in April 1960. SNCC grew into a large organization with many supporters in the North who helped raise funds to support SNCC's work in the South, allowing full-time SNCC workers to have a $10 per week salary.

STOKELY CARMICHAEL, (born:  Kwame Ture June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998),  was a Trinidadian-American BLACK ACTIVIST, active in the 1960's AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENTRights.   He rose to prominence first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, pronounced “snick”) and later as the “Honorary Prime Minister” of the Black Panther Party.   Carmichael later became affiliated with Black Nationalist and Pan-African movements.   He popularized the term “BLACK POWER”.

STOKELY CARMICHAEL, (born: Kwame Ture June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998), was a Trinidadian-American BLACK ACTIVIST, active in the 1960's AMERICAN CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENTRights. He rose to prominence first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, pronounced “snick”) and later as the “Honorary Prime Minister” of the Black Panther Party. Carmichael later became affiliated with Black Nationalist and Pan-African movements. He popularized the term “BLACK POWER”.

On February 1, 1960, a group of black college students from North Carolina A&T University refused to leave a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina where they had been denied service

On February 1, 1960, a group of black college students from North Carolina A&T University refused to leave a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina where they had been denied service

Radical change is not for the weak-hearted. Why are student protesters of today's campus movements so fearful? Read more about their vulnerability in Todd Gitlin's Op-Ed for NYT. (Photograph of  After a speech by Stokely Carmichael at a 1966 Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee rally in Farmville, Va., the crowd sang “We Shall Overcome.”)

Radical change is not for the weak-hearted. Why are student protesters of today's campus movements so fearful? Read more about their vulnerability in Todd Gitlin's Op-Ed for NYT. (Photograph of After a speech by Stokely Carmichael at a 1966 Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee rally in Farmville, Va., the crowd sang “We Shall Overcome.”)

Horace Julian Bond, known as Julian Bond, was a social activist and leader in the American civil rights movement, politician, professor, and writer. While a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, during the early 1960s, he helped to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee ...Horace Julian Bond, known as Julian Bond, was a social activist and leader in the American civil rights movement, politician, professor, and writer. While a student at Morehouse College in…

Horace Julian Bond, known as Julian Bond, was a social activist and leader in the American civil rights movement, politician, professor, and writer. While a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, during the early 1960s, he helped to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee ...Horace Julian Bond, known as Julian Bond, was a social activist and leader in the American civil rights movement, politician, professor, and writer. While a student at Morehouse College in…

James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on October 4, 1928, in Chicago, Illinois. As an 11-month-old baby, he was sent to live with his grandmother…James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on…

James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on October 4, 1928, in Chicago, Illinois. As an 11-month-old baby, he was sent to live with his grandmother…James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on…

<b>Maria Varela (1940–)</b><br>She was a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee from 1962 to 1967.Varela determined that these materials needed to show black people taking leadership to change their communities and enlisted SNCC photographer Bob Fletcher to take pictures for her various projects. Fletcher eventually challenged her to begin making her own photographs and recommended that she study with Matt Herron in New Orleans. <em>This photograph was taken as farm workers…

<b>Maria Varela (1940–)</b><br>She was a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee from 1962 to 1967.Varela determined that these materials needed to show black people taking leadership to change their communities and enlisted SNCC photographer Bob Fletcher to take pictures for her various projects. Fletcher eventually challenged her to begin making her own photographs and recommended that she study with Matt Herron in New Orleans. <em>This photograph was taken as farm workers…

No discussion of the Civil Rights Movement would be complete without studying and discussing the work of Diane Nash. Born in 1938 to a middle class, Catholic family in Chicago and raised partially by her grandmother, she initially planned on becoming a nun, but decided instead to enroll in Howard Un...Diane Nash: Co-Founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

No discussion of the Civil Rights Movement would be complete without studying and discussing the work of Diane Nash. Born in 1938 to a middle class, Catholic family in Chicago and raised partially by her grandmother, she initially planned on becoming a nun, but decided instead to enroll in Howard Un...Diane Nash: Co-Founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

April 15, 1960, about 150 student leaders from 10 states met at Shaw University in Raleigh for the “Southwide Leadership Conference on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation.” The organization was the beginning of SNCC

April 15, 1960, about 150 student leaders from 10 states met at Shaw University in Raleigh for the “Southwide Leadership Conference on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation.” The organization was the beginning of SNCC

Kathleen Neal Cleaver, who currently holds an appointment as a senior lecturer and research fellow at Emory University School of Law, has spent her life participating in the human rights struggle. She started alongside her parents in the 1950s civil rights protests in Alabama. By 1966, Kathleen Neal joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) where she served in its Campus Program based in Atlanta. She then moved to the San Francisco Ba

Kathleen Neal Cleaver, who currently holds an appointment as a senior lecturer and research fellow at Emory University School of Law, has spent her life participating in the human rights struggle. She started alongside her parents in the 1950s civil rights protests in Alabama. By 1966, Kathleen Neal joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) where she served in its Campus Program based in Atlanta. She then moved to the San Francisco Ba

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