Prehistoric cave painting- 35,000 years ago.  -Animals were important for very basic reasons in this time period. They were used for food, clothes, tools, and most interactions between them and humans remained primal.  -Depicted as flat, basic earth tones, usually through daily life scenes, such as the hunters above.

The Altamira cave paintings

Prehistoric cave painting- 35,000 years ago. -Animals were important for very basic reasons in this time period. They were used for food, clothes, tools, and most interactions between them and humans remained primal. -Depicted as flat, basic earth tones, usually through daily life scenes, such as the hunters above.

Lascaux Caves, a cave complex in southwestern #France, contain some of the most remarkable paleolithic cave paintings in the world, from at least 15,000 years ago. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Into the Woods — What hunters and trappers taught me about art.

Lascaux Caves, a cave complex in southwestern #France, contain some of the most remarkable paleolithic cave paintings in the world, from at least 15,000 years ago. Description from pinterest.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Mammoth tusk hut.  In 1965, four mammoth bone huts were found in Mezhirich…

Mammoth tusk hut. In 1965, four mammoth bone huts were found in Mezhirich…

Stone Age Animals Large Display Cut Out Pack - stone age, animals, display

Stone Age Animals Large Display Cut Out Pack - stone age, animals, display

TOOLS: Prehistoric artists employed a wide variety of painting methods,  using their fingers first and later pointed sticks, bone, pads of moss wrapped in hide or brushes made of animal hair, feathers or vegetable fibre. Ochre crayons were also used to apply pigment directly onto the surface. They also used spray painting techniques, by spitting out the mixed paint from their mouths and even using reeds or specially hollowed bones - saliva acts as a binder

TOOLS: Prehistoric artists employed a wide variety of painting methods, using their fingers first and later pointed sticks, bone, pads of moss wrapped in hide or brushes made of animal hair, feathers or vegetable fibre. Ochre crayons were also used to apply pigment directly onto the surface. They also used spray painting techniques, by spitting out the mixed paint from their mouths and even using reeds or specially hollowed bones - saliva acts as a binder

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