Alaska: Steller's Sea Cow

Alaska: Steller's Sea Cow

Steller's sea cow The species was quickly wiped out by the sailors, seal hunters, and fur traders who followed Bering's route past the islands to Alaska, who hunted it both for food and for skins, which were used to make boats. It was also hunted for its valuable subcutaneous fat, which was not only used for food (usually as a butter substitute), but also for oil lamps because it did not give off any smoke or odor and could be kept for a long time in warm weather without spoiling. By 1768…

Steller's sea cow The species was quickly wiped out by the sailors, seal hunters, and fur traders who followed Bering's route past the islands to Alaska, who hunted it both for food and for skins, which were used to make boats. It was also hunted for its valuable subcutaneous fat, which was not only used for food (usually as a butter substitute), but also for oil lamps because it did not give off any smoke or odor and could be kept for a long time in warm weather without spoiling. By 1768…

<p>The Steller's Sea Cow was hunted to extinction in Alaska by 1768</p>

<p>The Steller's Sea Cow was hunted to extinction in Alaska by 1768</p>

Steller's Sea Cow Hydrodamalis gigas extinct | Steller’s Sea Cow ( Hydrodamalis gigas) ~ World Extinct Animals

Steller's Sea Cow Hydrodamalis gigas extinct | Steller’s Sea Cow ( Hydrodamalis gigas) ~ World Extinct Animals

On March 10, 1709, German botanist, zoologist, physician and explorer Georg Wilhelm Steller was born. He joined the Russian explorer Vitus Bering on his second expedition to Kamchatka and Alaska, where he discovered numerous new species, as e.g. the Steller's sea cow that was named after him.

On March 10, 1709, German botanist, zoologist, physician and explorer Georg Wilhelm Steller was born. He joined the Russian explorer Vitus Bering on his second expedition to Kamchatka and Alaska, where he discovered numerous new species, as e.g. the Steller's sea cow that was named after him.

Steller's sea cow Steller's sea cow  The Steller's sea cow is related to the manatee and dugong, the two remaining species of sea cow. Growing up to at least 26-30 feet, Steller’s sea cows were once abundant in the in the Bering Sea between Alaska and Russia.  The species if named after German explorer Georg Wilhelm Steller, who discovered the sea cow along with the Commander Islands in 1741 when he and his crew were shipwrecked. Much of what is known about the sea cow in life comes from…

Steller's sea cow Steller's sea cow The Steller's sea cow is related to the manatee and dugong, the two remaining species of sea cow. Growing up to at least 26-30 feet, Steller’s sea cows were once abundant in the in the Bering Sea between Alaska and Russia. The species if named after German explorer Georg Wilhelm Steller, who discovered the sea cow along with the Commander Islands in 1741 when he and his crew were shipwrecked. Much of what is known about the sea cow in life comes from…

We all know the sad fate of the Dodo of Mauritius. The Steller's Sea Cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) is a lesser known case. This peaceful relative of Dugong and Manatee, up to 9 metres long, was catalogued in 1741 by the naturalist Steller, who travelled with Vitus Bering in present Bering Strait. The last Steller's Sea Cow was apparently killed in 1768: in just 27 years, men had managed to exterminate an entire species.

We all know the sad fate of the Dodo of Mauritius. The Steller's Sea Cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) is a lesser known case. This peaceful relative of Dugong and Manatee, up to 9 metres long, was catalogued in 1741 by the naturalist Steller, who travelled with Vitus Bering in present Bering Strait. The last Steller's Sea Cow was apparently killed in 1768: in just 27 years, men had managed to exterminate an entire species.

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