Today is the 14th anniversary of the day NASA launched the Mars Spirit Rover mission. It landed on the surface of the red planet successfully in January of 2004 and remained functional all the way until March of 2010. Notably, the rover was only supposed to last about 90 days, so NASA got their money's worth from Spirit. The rover remains unresponsive on Mars' surface to this day despite many previous attempts to hear back from it.

Today is the 14th anniversary of the day NASA launched the Mars Spirit Rover mission. It landed on the surface of the red planet successfully in January of 2004 and remained functional all the way until March of 2010. Notably, the rover was only supposed to last about 90 days, so NASA got their money's worth from Spirit. The rover remains unresponsive on Mars' surface to this day despite many previous attempts to hear back from it.

Adler Planetarium features the Spirit Rover robot used in the Mars Mission to explore the surface and collect mineral samples of hematite and rocks. Displays the robotics Mars Rover used in the planet Mars.

Adler Planetarium features the Spirit Rover robot used in the Mars Mission to explore the surface and collect mineral samples of hematite and rocks. Displays the robotics Mars Rover used in the planet Mars.

The center of the Gusev crater with the landing site of the NASA Spirit rover marked with a cross.

The center of the Gusev crater with the landing site of the NASA Spirit rover marked with a cross.

Gusev Crater 'East Basin' panorama taken from the summit of "Husband Hill" by the Mars Spirit Rover on Martian mission day Sol 653 (Nov 3, 2005 on Earth).

Gusev Crater 'East Basin' panorama taken from the summit of "Husband Hill" by the Mars Spirit Rover on Martian mission day Sol 653 (Nov 3, 2005 on Earth).

Celebrating Ten Years on Mars with NASA's Spirit Rover

Celebrating Ten Years on Mars with NASA's Spirit Rover

This bird's-eye view from August 2005 combines a self-portrait of the spacecraft deck and a panoramic mosaic of the Martian surface as viewed by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. The rover's solar panels are still gleaming in the sunlight

Check out these 10 cool facts about the Mars Spirit Rover and see what makes this rover's mission so critical to the search for water and life.

Check out these 10 cool facts about the Mars Spirit Rover and see what makes this rover's mission so critical to the search for water and life.

March 2010 Spirit Rover at Engineering Flats on Mars Credit: Mars Exploration Rover Mission, JPL, NASA This panoramic picture, created in 2004 and shown above compressed horizontally, was mostly unintentional -- the MERS team was primarily instructing Spirit to investigate rocks in and around Hank's Hollow in a location called Engineering Flats on Mars. After creating the ground display with its treads, the Spirit rover was instructed to photograph the area along with itself in shadow.

March 2010 Spirit Rover at Engineering Flats on Mars Credit: Mars Exploration Rover Mission, JPL, NASA This panoramic picture, created in 2004 and shown above compressed horizontally, was mostly unintentional -- the MERS team was primarily instructing Spirit to investigate rocks in and around Hank's Hollow in a location called Engineering Flats on Mars. After creating the ground display with its treads, the Spirit rover was instructed to photograph the area along with itself in shadow.

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?166872-Vintage-sports-and-racing-cars-pictures/page28

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?166872-Vintage-sports-and-racing-cars-pictures/page28

These are dust devils, strong whirlwinds of hot air, occuring on Mars. Compared to the terrestrial dust devils, Martian ones are very common there and can be up to fifty times as wide and ten times as high. Large ones may pose a threat to technology sent to Mars.  If humans make it to Mars, the dust devils pose potential hazards to them as well. “If Martian dust devils are highly electrified, as our research suggests, they will increase the tendency for dust to stick to space suits and…

These are dust devils, strong whirlwinds of hot air, occuring on Mars. Compared to the terrestrial dust devils, Martian ones are very common there and can be up to fifty times as wide and ten times as high. Large ones may pose a threat to technology sent to Mars. If humans make it to Mars, the dust devils pose potential hazards to them as well. “If Martian dust devils are highly electrified, as our research suggests, they will increase the tendency for dust to stick to space suits and…

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