At 7:28am on July 1st, 1916 the Battle of the Somme started with explosion of 17 massive 'mines' underneath enemy territory. Lochnagar was the largest of these. It remains "The largest crater ever made by man in anger".

At 7:28am on July 1st, 1916 the Battle of the Somme started with explosion of 17 massive 'mines' underneath enemy territory. Lochnagar was the largest of these. It remains "The largest crater ever made by man in anger".

Friday 1 July 2016 marks the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme, the biggest conflict seen on the Western Front during World War I. Here are some of the most arresting photos from the war. Contains graphic images.

The Most Powerful Images Of World War I

Friday 1 July 2016 marks the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme, the biggest conflict seen on the Western Front during World War I. Here are some of the most arresting photos from the war. Contains graphic images.

July 1, 1916. The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. Despite the heavy loss of life and failure to achieve the expected breakthrough, Field Marshal Haig and General Rawlinson deemed the attack a success, so much that the offensive was to continue for a further four months, only ending with the onset of winter. - prisonersofeternity.co.uk

July 1, 1916. The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. Despite the heavy loss of life and failure to achieve the expected breakthrough, Field Marshal Haig and General Rawlinson deemed the attack a success, so much that the offensive was to continue for a further four months, only ending with the onset of winter. - prisonersofeternity.co.uk

©IWM (Q 4499) WWI,13 Nov 1916, Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion. (Detail)

©IWM (Q 4499) WWI,13 Nov 1916, Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion. (Detail)

Colonel Philip R Robertson, commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) returning from a tour of his unit's positions in waterlogged trenches at Bois Grenier in January 1915.

Colonel Philip R Robertson, commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) returning from a tour of his unit's positions in waterlogged trenches at Bois Grenier in January 1915.

WWI. British troops advance in the Battle of the Somme, 1916. Nota: con riserva di dubbi a proposito di un'istantanea di questa qualità, negli anni della Prima Guerra Mondiale.

WWI. British troops advance in the Battle of the Somme, 1916. Nota: con riserva di dubbi a proposito di un'istantanea di questa qualità, negli anni della Prima Guerra Mondiale.

Field Marshall Douglas Haig rides a horse at an unknown location in France, Feb. 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

Never Before Published World War One Photographs Revealed

Field Marshall Douglas Haig rides a horse at an unknown location in France, Feb. 14, 1916. Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle.

Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but  no other day produced  such appalling losses

Dramatic photographs from WW1 that show the carnage... and courage

Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but no other day produced such appalling losses

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