Doomed? One of the most iconic images of the war shows soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, 1916. There were 60,000 British casualties that day - almost 20,000 died. The battle continued until mid-November, but no other day produced such appalling losses

Dramatic photographs from WW1 that show the carnage... and courage

Soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles waiting to join the offensive on the Somme on 1 July, There were British casualties that day - almost died. The battle continued until mid-November, but no other day produced such appalling losses.

Remembering The Battle Of The Somme – 100 Years On #Infographic #History #War

Remembering The Battle Of The Somme – 100 Years On #Infographic

©IWM (Q 4499) WWI,13 Nov 1916, Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion. (Detail)

©IWM (Q Nov Somme, Battle of the Ancre. A Military Policeman with a wounded German prisoner captured at St Pierre Divion.

A Boche prisoner, wounded and muddy is led along a railway track as British Army infantrymen return from another push on the battlefield

Heartbreaking photos of troops on the eve of the Somme 100 years ago

An Injured German solider being escorted by a British solider during the Somme Offensive, – July, 1916

During World War I, the Second Battle of Ypres was fought from 22 April – 25 May 1915 for control of the strategic Flemish town of Ypres in western Belgium after the First Battle of Ypres the previous autumn. It was the first mass use by Germany of poison gas on the Western Front. For the first time, a former colonial force (the 1st Canadian Division) defeated a European power (the German Empire) on European soil (in the battles of St. Julien and Kitcheners' Wood, engagements during the…

The Germans had the biggest artillery cannons and the fastest-firing machine guns in the world. They also had a chilling new weapon — deadly poison gas

Never Before Published World War One Photographs Revealed

Field Marshall Douglas Haig riding a horse at an unknown location in France February Haig was the British commander-in-chief during the Somme battle. (Photo by Collection Odette Carrez/Reuters)

At 7:28am on July 1st, 1916 the Battle of the Somme started with explosion of 17 massive 'mines' underneath enemy territory. Lochnagar was the largest of these. It remains "The largest crater ever made by man in anger". Repined by HistorySimulation.com

At on July 1916 the Battle of the Somme started with explosion of 17 massive 'mines' underneath enemy territory. Lochnagar was the largest of these. It remains "The largest crater ever made by man in anger".

British and German soldiers, Somme Battle, 1916 /35158/

Ukraine scale plastic model kits figures, British and German soldiers, Somme Battle, 1916

Sept 9, 1916 - The Somme: Battle of Ginchy, Somme Campaign at a Tipping Point…

“September 1916 - The Somme: Battle of Ginchy, Somme Campaign at a Tipping Point Pictured - The Dublin Fusiliers go over the top on September Allied blows are now falling heavily and rapidly, and the Germans are reeling.

Diagram of a trench in WWI

Trench construction in World War I

The Long, Long Trail The British Army in the Great War WWI Battle of the Somme Trench layout- i think this is a great overlook of the trenches and makes it easy to understand

WW1, Somme: Battle of Bazentin Ridge. Long line of German POWs being marched into Fricourt. July 14,1916.

Somme: Battle of Bazentin Ridge. Long line of German POWs being marched into Fricourt.

A sign reading 'pack transport this way' sticks out among leafless trees stripped by artillery fire near the frontline of the Somme battle

Heartbreaking photos of troops on the eve of the Somme 100 years ago

A sign reading 'pack transport this way' sticks out among leafless trees stripped by artillery fire near the frontline of the Somme battle

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