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"Sometimes It's Okay To Break The Law" and they did. #US History and Civil Rights Movement More

An African-American Woman Being Carried by the Police During a Civil Rights Protest: A Proud Heritage: Photos From the Civil Rights Movement

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Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael; June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998) was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. He rose to prominence first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party. Initially an integrationist, Carmichael later became affiliated with black nationalist and Pan-Africanist movements. He popularized the term "Black Power".

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Daisy Bates and the Little Rock Nine In 1958, LIFE's Paul Schutzer photographed activist Daisy Bates (fourth from left) as she posed in front of the U.S. Supreme Court with members of the Little Rock Nine. Standing tall and proud in front of the highest court in the land, these civil rights pioneers assert their identities as Americans worthy of all every protection under the law.

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7 Of The Most Unrecognized Women in Black History

Diane Nash - A leader & strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement, Diane Nash was a member of the Freedom Riders. She also helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) & the Selma Voting Rights Committee campaign, which helped blacks in the South to vote & have political power. A bright, focused, utterly fearless woman, with an unerring instinct for the correct tactical move at each increment of the crisis; a leader, with flawless instincts.

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Photos of Female Civil Rights Leaders

Diane Nash (far right) was the key strategist behind the first successful campaign to desegregate lunch counters in Nashville, leader of the Nashville Student Freedom Ride campaign to desegregate interstate travel, and a founder of both the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Selma Voting Rights Campaign.

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Jon Lewis was 23 when he was selected to be a featured speaker at the March on Washington. He was arrested scores of times during the civil rights movement and was badly beaten during a 1961 freedom ride protesting the segregation of interstate buses and at a 1965 march in Selma, Ala. Both events would prove to be turning points in the struggle for racial equality

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Lunch Counter Sit-In, Jackson Mississippi, 1963: Civil Rights demonstrators being taunted and covered with sugar, mustard and ketchup.

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Horace Julian Bond (January 14, 1940 – August 15, 2015) Julian Bond, was an American social activist and leader in the Civil Rights Movement, politician, professor, and writer. At Morehouse College inthe 60's he helped to establish the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Bond was elected to four terms in the Georgia House of Representatives and six terms in the Georgia Senate.

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