On June 21, 1964, while SNCC was training hundreds of mostly white and northern student volunteers to help register black folk to vote as part of “Freedom Summer,” three civil rights workers-- James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner—who were working on a Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) project, were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). Two were white and Jewish, both from New York and one was black from Meridian, Mississippi.

On June 21, 1964, while SNCC was training hundreds of mostly white and northern student volunteers to help register black folk to vote as part of “Freedom Summer,” three civil rights workers-- James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner—who were working on a Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) project, were murdered by the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). Two were white and Jewish, both from New York and one was black from Meridian, Mississippi.

Free Connie Tucker - JOMO 1970 button. Black Panther Party - SNCC - Civil Rights

Free Connie Tucker - JOMO 1970 button. Black Panther Party - SNCC - Civil Rights

Free Connie Tucker - JOMO Circa1970 button.Black Panther Party SNCC Civil Rights

Free Connie Tucker - JOMO Circa1970 button.Black Panther Party SNCC Civil Rights

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, often pronounced /ˈsnɪk/ snick) was one of the most important organizations of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s.[1][2] It emerged from a student meeting organized by Ella Baker held at Shaw University in April 1960. SNCC grew into a large organization with many supporters in the North who helped raise funds to support SNCC's work in the South, allowing full-time SNCC workers to have a $10 per week salary.

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC, often pronounced /ˈsnɪk/ snick) was one of the most important organizations of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s.[1][2] It emerged from a student meeting organized by Ella Baker held at Shaw University in April 1960. SNCC grew into a large organization with many supporters in the North who helped raise funds to support SNCC's work in the South, allowing full-time SNCC workers to have a $10 per week salary.

Rare 60's SOUTHERN SNCC CIVIL RIGHTS Black Power Cause Political Pinback Button

Rare 60's SOUTHERN SNCC CIVIL RIGHTS Black Power Cause Political Pinback Button

Civil rights leader and political activist James Forman was an instrumental leader in the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), sending demonsCivil rights leader and political activist James Forman was an instrumental leader in the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), sending demonstrators to the South for the Freedom Ride protests. Other amazing facts about civil rights leader and political activist James Forman include:   1. Born in Chicago, Illinois on October…

Civil rights leader and political activist James Forman was an instrumental leader in the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), sending demonsCivil rights leader and political activist James Forman was an instrumental leader in the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), sending demonstrators to the South for the Freedom Ride protests. Other amazing facts about civil rights leader and political activist James Forman include: 1. Born in Chicago, Illinois on October…

An African-American Woman Being Carried by the Police During a Civil Rights Protest:  A Proud Heritage: Photos From the Civil Rights Movement

An African-American Woman Being Carried by the Police During a Civil Rights Protest: A Proud Heritage: Photos From the Civil Rights Movement

Diane Nash was a vocal proponent of nonviolent action even before she became involved with Martin Luther King, the SNCC, and the SCLC. In 1960 she helped lead the Nashville sit-ins, which ended lunch counter segregation in the city, and in 1961 she was a key figure in the Freedom Rides. She was also married to fellow civil rights activist James Bevel for seven years.Who's Who in 'Selma': Pictures and Histories of 29 Real People Who Appear in the Movie

Diane Nash was a vocal proponent of nonviolent action even before she became involved with Martin Luther King, the SNCC, and the SCLC. In 1960 she helped lead the Nashville sit-ins, which ended lunch counter segregation in the city, and in 1961 she was a key figure in the Freedom Rides. She was also married to fellow civil rights activist James Bevel for seven years.Who's Who in 'Selma': Pictures and Histories of 29 Real People Who Appear in the Movie

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