Siege of Petersburg VA

Siege of Petersburg Date June 1864 – March 1865 Location Petersburg, Virginia Victor Union victory Contenders United Sta

Everything you need to know about the Siege of Petersburg in 250 words or less.

The Siege of Petersburg

Learn more about the Petersburg Campaign. Our 10 Facts are designed to help expand your knowledge and appreciation for this 9 and a half month Civil War campaign around the strategic town of Petersburg, Virginia.

Petersburg Battlefield, Petersburg, Virginia.  Nine and one-half months, 70,000 casualties, thousands of U.S. Colored Troops fighting for their freedom, the suffering of civilians, and the decline of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Northern Virginia Army all describe the Siege of Petersburg.  It was here Gen. Ulysses S. Grant cut off all of Petersburg's supply lines ensuring the fall of Richmond on April 3, 1865.  Six days later, Lee surrendered.

The Civil War Trust's Battle of Petersburg page includes maps, photos, history articles, facts, and the latest preservation news for this 1864 Civil War battle in Virginia.

One of the leaders of the Union Irish Brigade, Colonel Patrick Kelly was killed June 14th 1864 while at the head of his men at the Siege of Petersburg.

One of the leaders of the Union Irish Brigade, Colonel Patrick Kelly was killed June 1864 while at the head of his men at the Siege of Petersburg.

General Ulysses S. Grant (center of bench beside tree) on eve of Siege of Petersburg VA, 1864.  Photo by Timothy H. O'Sullivan.

Michael Beschloss on

“Civil War General & President Ulysses Grant born today (between trees) 150 years ago next month:

July 1864. "Broadway Landing, Virginia. Surgeons of 4th Division, 9th Army Corps, in front of Petersburg." Main Eastern theater of war, the siege of Petersburg. Wet plate glass negative, photographer unknown.

broadway landing, virginia, surgeons of division, army corps in front of petersburg, 1864

April 3, 1865. Petersburg, Virginia. "Dead Confederate soldiers in trench beyond a section of chevaux-de-frise."

The siege of Petersburg, June 1865 Dead Confederate soldier, in trench beyond a section of chevaux-de-frise.

Gen. J.C. Robinson and other locomotives of the U.S. Military Railroad. From views of the main Eastern theater of war, the siege of Petersburg, June 1864-April 1865.  City Point, Virginia, circa 1865

Never knew about this before. Robinson and other locomotives of the U. From views of the main Eastern theater of war, the siege of Petersburg, June City Point, Virginia, circa 1865

A Guide to the American Civil War: Civil War: The War in the East, 1863-1865

A Guide to the American Civil War

Soldiers of the VI Corps Army of the Potomac in trenches before storming Marye's Heights at the Second Battle of Fredericksburg during the Chancellorsville campaign Virginia May

Archibald Gracie IV was born on 17 January, 1859 in Mobile, Alabama. He came from a wealthy New York State family, whose mansion would later become the official residence of the mayor of New York. His father, a Confederate general, was killed at the Siege of Petersburg in 1864. Gracie also served in the army, graduating from West Point Military Academy. Gracie died on 4 December, 1912, never having fully recovered from the trauma.

Archibald Gracie IV was born on 17 January, 1859 in Mobile, Alabama. He came from a wealthy New York State family, whose mansion would later become the official residence of the mayor of New York. His father, a Confederate general, was killed at the Siege of Petersburg in 1864. Gracie also served in the army, graduating from West Point Military Academy. Gracie died on 4 December, 1912, never having fully recovered from the trauma.

"Mahone's Counterattack - Battle of the Crater, during the siege of Petersburg, July 30, 1864"

Mahone's Counterattack" Battle of the Crater , during the siege of Petersburg, July This depicts the fighting just out the the crater proper , in the surrounding entrenchments.

The Siege of Leningrad, also known as the Leningrad Blockade was a prolonged military blockade undertaken mainly by the German Army Group North against Leningrad, historically and currently known as Saint Petersburg, in the Eastern Front theatre of World War II. The siege started on September 8, 1941, when the last road to the city was severed. Although the Soviets managed to open a narrow land corridor to the city on January 18, 1943, the siege was only lifted on January 27, 1944, 872 days…

The Siege of Leningrad, also known as the Leningrad Blockade was a prolonged military blockade undertaken mainly by the German Army Group North against Leningrad, historically and currently known as Saint Petersburg, in the Eastern Front theatre of World War II. The siege started on September 8, 1941, when the last road to the city was severed. Although the Soviets managed to open a narrow land corridor to the city on January 18, 1943, the siege was only lifted on January 27, 1944, 872 days…

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