Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. (via BBC News; image via ESO)

'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. (via BBC News; image via ESO)

Picture Rex

Mysterious ‘rogue planet’ floating through space may be even odder than we thought

42 Facts About Space, A Homage to Douglas Adams. - Imgur

42 Facts About Space, A Homage to Douglas Adams.

In this artist's conception, a rogue planet drifts through space. Credit: Christine Pulliam (CfA)

In this artist's conception, a rogue planet drifts through space. Credit: Christine Pulliam (CfA)

The Universe is amazing! Did you know this about Rogue planets?

Some stars capture rogue planets

The Universe is amazing! Did you know this about Rogue planets?

"Rogue" planet CFBDSIR2149

'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

Runaway Planets: The Rogues of the Universe  A rogue planet (or a free floating planet) is generally a Jupiter sized body that inhabits the space between stars, unbound by the gravity of a parent star. It's believed that these planets either formed directly from the collapse of interstellar gas clouds (like stars) without having the mass to ignite (like a brown dwarf), or they were formed in a planetary system and they somehow overcame the gravity of their star and were eje

Runaway Planets: The Rogues of the Universe A rogue planet (or a free floating planet) is generally a Jupiter sized body that inhabits the space between stars, unbound by the gravity of a parent star. It's believed that these planets either formed directly from the collapse of interstellar gas clouds (like stars) without having the mass to ignite (like a brown dwarf), or they were formed in a planetary system and they somehow overcame the gravity of their star and were eje

Rogue planets can form without a parent star.  Scientists call them free-floating planets — massive celestial wanderers that have broken free from the confines of their original solar system. Or perhaps not. New research suggests that these so-called rogue planets may have formed completely on their own — and that there could be billions of them.

Rogue planets can form without a parent star

Rogue planets can form without a parent star. Scientists call them free-floating planets — massive celestial wanderers that have broken free from the confines of their original solar system. Or perhaps not. New research suggests that these so-called rogue planets may have formed completely on their own — and that there could be billions of them.

Pinterest
Search